Search Results for: No days off

Rains rejuvenated crops

The return of precipitation following a multi-week dry spell elevated soil moisture supplies, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 3% very short, 17% short, 73% adequate, and 7% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending July 10 was 73.9 degrees, 0.7 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.86 inches of precipitation, 1.08 inches above average. There were 3.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 10.

Producers were pleased by last week’s increased rainfall but remained concerned that corn and soybean progress had fallen behind historical averages. Livestock were reported to be in good condition, with pastures greening after the week’s rains. Corn silking progress was 7% complete while corn condition was rated 52% good to excellent. Soybeans were 97% emerged, 33% of plants were blooming, and pod setting progress reached 5%. 48% of soybean plants were reported as being in good to excellent condition. … Continue reading

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Proper site sets the stage for success

By Matt Reese

The siting of a livestock facility can have countless implications — both good and bad — for decades into the future. It is not something to be taken lightly. 

“In 2015, the Ohio Pork Council developed a siting program that assisted individuals in making systematic, informed decision for the placement of barns. After public pressure about the building of new hog barns, OPC wanted to equip producers with education to properly evaluate the right location for a barn,” said Cheryl Day, executive vice president of the Ohio Pork Council. “The assessment is simply one of many tools to help producers evaluate possible sites for a hog facility. Educational workshops were held throughout 2016 teaching producers how to use the tools and help educate them on being good neighbors.”

The program provides a scoring system for properly siting new hog facilities to maximize the quality of care for the animals, sustainability and efficiency, while minimizing environmental impacts and disease concerns.  … Continue reading

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Food banks face a “long, hot summer of need”

By Matt Reese

Those who know can hear the difference.

The sound of open space echoing around the vast storage facility of the Mid-Ohio Food Collective in Grove City is a growing concern. Heading into the high-demand summer season, supplies were at 25% capacity. 

At a time when food is needed most, it is in increasingly shorter supply at food banks around Ohio, said Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Foodbanks. 

“Food scarcity and hunger rates are now elevated above the height of the pandemic, which is hard to believe, but there are many reasons for that. We’re seeing our job market recover, but wages continue to be stagnant in the lower sectors — like the service sector — of the economy,” Hamler-Fugitt said. “We are seeing shortages that are exacerbated by the supply chain issues. This is not just in the grocery store — it is all of the inputs that need to go into food production of everything from livestock to additives or the packaging.… Continue reading

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Wheat harvest ahead of last year, average

Continued hot and dry weather raised concerns among some farmers about deteriorating crop conditions, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 17 percent very short, 49 percent short, 33 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending July 3 was 72.1 degrees, 0.7 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.41 inches of precipitation, 0.76 inches below average. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on July 3.

Reporters across the State indicated that corn and soybean crops are displaying signs of stress, a consequence of continued below-average precipitation. Corn and soybean conditions declined slightly from the previous week. Livestock were in good condition. Corn had yet to advance to the silking stage. Soybeans were 95 percent emerged and 5 percent of plants were blooming. Oats were 82 percent headed.… Continue reading

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Weed control in double-crop beans

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

It’s been a tough summer in parts of Ohio to do anything on a timely schedule and there are some weedy fields. The best advice we have for big weeds in full-season soybeans is to increase rates and the complexity of POST herbicide applications, while still adhering to cutoffs for the application of certain herbicides as much as possible. Dicamba products, XtendiMax, Engenia, and Tavium, cannot legally be applied to Xtend and XtendiFlex soybeans after June 30. This cutoff date pertains to use in double-crop soybeans also. 

If you are planning on planting Xtend or XtendiFlex soybeans in double-crop fields and using dicamba as a burndown, apply before Friday. There isn’t a cutoff date for most other POST soybean herbicides — it’s based on either crop stage (eg R1) or days before harvest. 

Double-crop soybeans usually need some type of weed control program, although how weedy they get depends upon weeds surviving down in the wheat that can take off once they receive light; how much rain we get in July, which drives additional weed emergence and rate of soybean growth; and how fast the soybeans grow and develop a canopy.… Continue reading

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Dry weather facilitates progress

Driven by dry weather, crop conditions declined slightly from the previous week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 4% very short, 35% short, 57% adequate, and 4% surplus.

Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending June 26 was 73.2 degrees, 2.5 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.16 inches of precipitation, 0.72 inches below average. There were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on June 26.page1image1026845664

Reporters indicated that producers took advantage of the past week’s dry weather to wrap up planting activities. Farmers across the State reported that limited recent precipitation has translated into early signs of crop stress. Livestock were in good condition. Corn was 95% emerged, behind last year but slightly ahead of average. Soybean planting progress was 96% complete, while 85% of seedlings were emerged. Oats were 67% headed, behind last year and average.… Continue reading

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Angler surveys underway

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

Angler surveys are underway at many of Ohio’s popular public inland waterways and Lake Erie, information from which is crucial to maintaining and improving the quality of Ohio’s public fisheries and angling opportunities.

Eighteen creel clerks are gathering information this summer; six are based on the shore of Lake Erie, two on the Maumee and Sandusky rivers, five on the Ohio River, and five at inland reservoirs. Lake Erie surveys are ongoing until October; surveys at inland reservoirs run until November, and along the Ohio River until the end of the year. Historical surveys reveal that Ohio’s most popular species to target include walleye, yellow perch, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, trout, saugeye, sunfish, crappie, and catfish.

Division of Wildlife creel clerks collect information directly from anglers to generate estimates of fishing effort, catch rates, and harvest rates.… Continue reading

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2022 Cab Cams: Challenging 2022 planting season for Ohio

By Matt Reese and Dusty Sonnenberg

The 2022 planting season was across-the-board frustrating for Ohio’s crop growers and generally challenging nationwide. Extended cool weather through March, April and well into May paired with saturated soils and frequent rains made good planting windows very elusive. By late May, Ohio’s corn and soybean growers were able to close the wide planting progress gap compared to the 5-year average with 72% of the state’s corn planted and 56% of the soybeans planted, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Ohio Field Office.

Before most of the state’s corn and soybean ground was fit, Kyle Shepherd had some chances at Baughman Farms in late April to get carrots, red beets and parsley planted for the nearby Campbell’s Soup plant in well-drained Henry County fields.

“We have been raising these vegetables since the mid-70s for Campbell’s Soup. The V8 Plant is just 3 miles down the road,” Shepherd said.… Continue reading

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Soybean emergence trails average, some planting remains

While temperatures and humidity levels soared, farmers all but completed the last of their intended plantings, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 6 percent short, 72 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending June 19 was 75.0 degrees, 4.7 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.11 inches of precipitation, 0.14 inches above average. There were 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on June 19.

Strong storms early in the week harmed some crops, with reports of corn, wheat, alfalfa, and hay being flattened by roaring winds. Farmers reported limited replanting necessitated by excess rainfall, high winds, and subsequent soil crusting. Livestock demonstrated fatigue stemming from the heat and humidity. Corn was 97 percent planted, and 88 percent of corn had emerged. Soybean planting progress was 90 percent complete, while 74 percent were emerged.… Continue reading

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Growth stage has major impact on crop survival in flooded conditions

By Alexander LindseyMark SulcLaura LindseyOsler OrtezPeter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension

Large rain events seem to be trending this year in many parts of Ohio, especially in Northwest Ohio where 3 to 5 inches of rain fell in 24 to 48 hours. This can lead to standing water (flood) conditions or waterlogged soils (the root system is saturated). In some areas, this may have resulted in a partial and complete immersion of plants, especially in low spots, on river bottoms, and along streams. Many crops are sensitive to excess water, but the amount of damage is typically driven by plant growth stage, rainfall intensity, and duration of saturated/flooded conditions.

In corn, waterlogged conditions from V4-V16 can limit yield potential by reducing ear size, the number of kernel rows per ear, and also the potential number of kernels per row. Yield loss in corn can also be affected by Nitrogen (N) application.… Continue reading

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Crop progress remains just ahead of average, trails last year

Farmers made strides towards completing key plantings while they contended with wet conditions, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent short, 57 percent adequate, and 42 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending June 12 was 67.5 degrees, 0.4 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.74 inches of precipitation, 0.79 inches above average. There were 2.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on June 12.

Excessive rains brought weekly precipitation levels as high as 300% of weekly average totals across the State’s northwest and south. Reporters in the State’s east indicated that waterlogged soils may necessitate some corn and soybean replanting. Livestock enjoyed good pasture conditions. Other fieldwork activities for the week included herbicide application, side-dressing corn, and mowing. Corn was 93 percent planted, and 80 percent of corn had emerged. Soybean planting progress was 80 percent complete, while 63 percent were emerged.… Continue reading

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Growing beer at Barn Talk Hops

By Brianna Gwirtz, OCJ field reporter

No matter where you travel in Ohio these days, you’re not far from a craft brewery. According to the Ohio Craft Brewers Association, the state has 398 craft breweries, ranking fifth in total production in the United States. The rise in craft breweries has led to an increase in demand for local hops.

Hops are an essential ingredient in beer, adding bitterness to counteract the sweetness of the malt. USDA records from the late 1800s show that hops were grown across many counties in the state, but their popularity waned in the early 1900s due to Prohibition and plant disease pressure. A re-energized interest in local brews and local products over the last decade has resurged the demand for hop production in Ohio.

Barn Talk Hops in Medina County, owned by Mike and Jenny Napier, is working to fill the need for locally grown hops.… Continue reading

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Boaters be fuel-aware

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

There’s been a lot of pain at the pump lately with gas prices. The Biden administration’s recent move to give a waiver from the Clean Air Act to allow the sale of gasoline containing 15% Ethanol (E15) during the summer months is intended to lower costs and stretch the nation’s fuel supply. However, Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) says the unintended consequence of the waiver could inadvertently put a harmful fuel prohibited for use in recreational vessels into your boat’s gas tank.

BoatUS notes recreational vessels are never compatible with E15 (15% ethanol). It is not permitted by federal law to use E15 fuel in boats (as well as motorcycles, off-road vehicles and power equipment), voids the engine warranty, and it has been proven to cause damage to marine engines. It also causes engines to run hotter and contains less energy than E10.… Continue reading

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Hay barn fires are a real hazard

By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Allen Gahler, Mark Sulc, Ohio State University Extension

Mother Nature has been at it again, hardly giving us enough days to make dry hay with a risk of pop-up showers every afternoon. These conditions are very dangerous for hay producers. Since wet hay does just rot it may also burn. Hay fires are caused when bacteria in wet hay create so much heat that the hay spontaneously combusts in the presence of oxygen. At over 20% moisture, mesophilic bacteria release heat-causing temperature to rise between 130 degrees F to 140 degrees F with the temperature staying high for up to 40 days. As temperatures rise thermophilic bacteria can take off in your hay and raise the temperature into the fire danger zone of over 175 degrees F.

Assessing risk

If the hay was baled between 15% and 20% moisture and acid preservatives were used, there is still potential for a hay fire but not as great as on non-treated hay.Continue reading

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Planting continues to lag last year, hovers near average

Farmers rushed to plant during last week’s warm and sunny conditions, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent very short, 2 percent short, 64 percent adequate, and 33 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending June 5 was 71.7 degrees, 6.1 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.58 inches of precipitation, 0.38 inches below average.
There were 3.9 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on June 5.

Good weather permitted farmers to make significant corn and soybean planting progress last week. Livestock enjoyed pastures still green from the wet spring in most areas, though the week’s dryness contributed to limited reports of increasingly parched pastures. Corn was 85 percent planted, and 65 percent of corn had emerged. Soybean planting progress was 71 percent complete, while 47 percent were emerged. Oats were 99 percent planted and 93 percent of oats were emerged.… Continue reading

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The end is near for the long 2022 planting season

Kurt Wyler

We have made good progress the last 2 weeks. We’ve had decent weather and have covered a lot of ground. There have been a few rains but nothing to keep us out of the field more than a day or 2. We can’t complain.

Everything we have in the ground seems to be coming up nicely and looking good. We are getting things wrapped up along with most everyone in this area. The forecast is calling for a pretty good rain later today but we think we should be able to finish up before it hits. We have about 45 acres of corn and 90 acres of beans and we will be completely wrapped up with planting. The other day I planted 65 acres and was in 12 different fields, so some of our field sizes can really slow us down.

We farm 80% hill ground with some bottom ground.… Continue reading

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Tenant’s right to buy land at landowner’s death

By Robert Moore, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

The relationship between farmland owner and tenant often goes beyond just a business transaction. It is common for the tenant to lease the same farmland for many years or for the tenant/landowner relationship to span several generations. The relationship between the parties may evolve into one of great trust and respect — the landowner knowing that the tenant will treat the land like their own and the tenant knowing the landlord will always be fair with them.

Sometimes, when the landowner knows that their heirs do not have interest in owning the land, they will promise to give the tenant the first chance to buy the farm at landowner’s death. Tenants will always appreciate this gesture so that they do not have to outbid their neighbors at a public auction when the landowner dies. However, a mere promise is not enough.… Continue reading

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Soybean planting progress and vegetative growth

By Dr. Laura Lindsey Adapted from C.O.R.N. Newsletter 2022-15

Cool, wet weather in April and early May delayed soybean planting progress; however, with some warmer and drier days, soybean planting was 18% complete by the second week of May (Table 1). Soybeans that were planted the end of April or first week of May are likely at the VC growth stage or will be at the VC growth stage soon.

What does the soybean crop need to maximize yield during vegetative growth? During vegetative growth, green plants use the energy in sunlight to power photosynthesis. This process uses water, carbon dioxide from the air and light energy to produce sugars. Sugars are then converted into plant dry matter. Chlorophyll in green leaves, stems and pods gathers light for photosynthesis. During vegetative growth, plant dry matter distributed to leaves, stems and roots enables the plant to “build the factory” for producing seed later in the season.

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Planting progress catches average, trails last year

Excessive soil moisture continued to delay planting and fieldwork, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1 percent short, 52 percent adequate, and 47 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending May 29 was 63.3 degrees, 0.1 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.19 inches of precipitation, 0.14 inches below average, with late-week rain saturating fields and generating runoff. There were 2.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on May 29.

Farmers described inadequate opportunities for fields to dry, with some areas of the State reporting ponding. Livestock were doing well in pasture, benefitting from moderate temperatures and green grass. Corn was 72 percent planted, and 51 percent of corn had emerged. Soybean planting progress was 56 percent, while 29 percent were emerged. Oats were 96 percent planted and 86 percent of oats were emerged.… Continue reading

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Over half of Ohio’s corn crop planted

Farmers took advantage of planting opportunities in between rain events, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 3 percent short, 61 percent adequate, and 36 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending May 22 was 67.0 degrees, 4.6 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.73 inches of precipitation, 0.92 inches above average, with the largest amount of precipitation falling across the Central Lowland region. There were 3.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending on May 22.

Farmers described fieldwork activities as including tillage, planting, and applying manure but reported disruptions stemming from early- and late-week rain and wind. Livestock were in favorable condition, benefitting from green grass and warm temperatures. Corn was 52 percent planted, and 24 percent of corn had emerged. Soybean planting progress was 36 percent, while 12 percent were emerged. Oats were 90 percent planted and 72 percent of oats were emerged.… Continue reading

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