Search Results for: No days off

Useful tips for year-end clean-up

By Brian Ravencraft

The end of 2022 is upon us. In fact, it is almost here. What year-end clean-up and planning exercises should business owners and farmers be taking part in before the year draws to a close? I asked some of my colleagues at Holbrook & Manter to weigh in. See their tips below.

The end of the year can be a busy time for small business owners with the holidays, and wrapping up projects before the New Year. However, it is not the time to forget about financial planning and taxes. Small business owners should be ensuring their books are up to date and accurate. This can help in determining where they can expect profits to be for the year. Once this information is together, they should be working very closely with their tax accountant to ensure they are prepared for any taxes they may owe, as well as to utilize any tax savings.… Continue reading

Read More »

Drought concerns increase despite rains

Mild and dry days throughout most of last week supported late-season harvest progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Dry conditions persisted across many western and central counties during the past week, with the U.S. Drought Monitor showing moderate to severe drought in 66.8% of the State as of Nov. 8, up from 42.6% the week before. Abnormally dry conditions or worse were observed in 88.3% of the State, up from 85.6% during the previous week. Field fire potential remained a concern in southwestern counties. A multi-week pattern of dry days was broken last Friday when remnants of Hurricane Nicole soaked extensive portions of southern and eastern counties. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 22% very short, 30% short, 46% adequate, and 2% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending Nov. 13 was 48.2 degrees, 5.7 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.36 inches of precipitation, 0.56 inches above average.… Continue reading

Read More »

Still grazing?

By Chris Penrose, Professor and Ag & Natural Resource Educator, Morgan County Extension

I still am but I am not sure how much longer. My goal is to make it well into December then stop feeding most of the cows hay in early March. I started to stockpile some of my fields in August and everything was going great and growing through September. I even tried a technique that has been used on the east coast to lightly graze well stockpiled fields while there is still time for regrowth. The principle behind that is to stimulate new growth on the stockpiled grass that has slowed down. I took the cattle off the field around the first of October assuming another month of growth but guess what? Grass does not grow much when you get no rain. I actually had one of the best forage growing seasons I can recall until October, so I do have plenty of hay.… Continue reading

Read More »

Drought conditions expanding in Ohio

By Aaron Wilson, Ohio State University Extension

Drought conditions continue to expand across Ohio. As of the latest U.S. Drought Monitor report on Thursday November 3, 2022, 86% of Ohio is abnormally dry with 43% of the state classified as D1 or in Moderate Drought. West Central Ohio (centered on Darke County) has been particularly dry, only receiving about 25% of normal rainfall over the last 90 days. Dry conditions have dropped stream flows, diminshed soil moisture, hindered wheat and cover crop emergence, and contributed to numerous field and equipment fires across the region. Record highs in the upper 70s combined with gusty winds over this past weekend did little to help conditions. Over the past two months, several stations across Ohio (Akron, Dayon, Cincinnati, Columbus, Findlay, and New Philadelphia) have all experienced their top 5 driest streatches for this period. For the latest up-to-date conditions, seasonal outlooks, and monthly climate summaries, please visit the State Climate Office of Ohio.… Continue reading

Read More »

Roots Eat Bacteria

By James Hoorman Hoorman Soil Health Services

(Source: Jeff Lowenfels, Teaming with Bacteria, 2022)   

Do plant roots really eat bacteria?  The answer is Yes (sort of!). In the last 5-10 years, our understanding of how plants acquire nutrients has changed dramatically. With new stronger microscopes; Australian scientist and Dr. James White, Rutgers university have discovered that plant roots are taking in endophytic (translation: “within the plant”) bacteria and acquiring nutrients from these microbes.  One study estimates that 47% of the atmospheric nitrogen (N) and perhaps as much as 70% of the plants N might be acquired from bacteria absorbed and living between plant cells and within plant cells.  This newly discovered processed is called rhizophagy.

We should not be too surprised. Farmers inoculate legumes (soybeans, peas) with Rhizobium bacteria which reside in plant nodules and fix N .  Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) also enter roots and live between plant cells. … Continue reading

Read More »

Dry conditions continue as harvest winds down

Late-week rains provided some much-needed moisture to dry fields, but accumulated precipitation totals for the season remained well below average, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Dry conditions continued to dominate in many counties, with U.S. Drought Monitor showing moderate drought in 42.6% of the State, up from 36.3% during the previous week. Abnormally dry conditions or worse were observed in 85.6% of the State, up from 73.4% during the previous week. Reporters in southwestern counties commented on continued enhanced fire risk due to persistent dry conditions. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 24% very short, 41% short, 34% adequate, and 1% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending November 6 was 57.6 degrees, 9.5 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.29 inches of precipitation, 0.42 inches below average. There were 6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Nov. 6. … Continue reading

Read More »

Harvest winding down

Ryan Hiser

It has been unbelievable how long the weather has held. We haven’t really experienced a whole lot of damp or wet conditions. I can’t believe that we were able to get the beans off as fast as we were for as late as they were planted. Corn is coming off pretty well. The ground is dry so we’re not worried about compaction issues or rutting up fields. We’ve got about all 290 acres to go roughly. 

Soybeans were kind of disappointing. Yields were just based on the conditions we had. We were just fortunate we had a crop, but in some ways exceeded a little bit of my expectations. I was preparing for the worst. Most of the crop managed to be in the mid 40s to low 50s so I think we did all right for what was there, the conditions and how many times we had to replant it.… Continue reading

Read More »

Water: The most important nutrient

By Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist, OSU Extension

At a recent East Central Grazing Alliance pasture walk in Noble County I was invited to speak on the broad topic of water for livestock. Hopefully by now we all know that water is the most important nutrient for all living organisms and without water, production agriculture today would look very different.

Water Quantity

One of the first discussion points regarding water, is quantity – how much water do we need for animals to perform at optimal levels? Do we have enough flow rate from our source to maintain several animals drinking at once, and is our drinking tank large enough?

Water requirements for beef cattle depend on body weight, stage of production (gestation vs. lactation), and temperature.

Generally, cattle will consume 1 gallon of water per 100 pounds of bodyweight during cooler weather and nearly twice as much on hotter days.… Continue reading

Read More »

Three fishing lines per angler allowed 

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show 

It’s official: Inland Ohio anglers will be allowed to use up to three lines at once in 2023 and beyond. The Ohio Wildlife Council voted to approve a proposal to allow a maximum of three fishing lines statewide and the rule will take effect on Jan. 1, 2023. The change aligns statewide fishing regulations with those already in place in the Lake Erie Sport Fishing District, Ohio River fishing units, and Pymatuning Lake by increasing the limit to three lines per person.  

The council also voted to remove site-specific catfish regulations for Hoover Reservoir and align the popular central Ohio fishing destination with statewide rules for blue and channel catfish. Beginning Jan. 1, 2023, catfish anglers can harvest one blue catfish 35 inches or longer and one channel catfish 28 inches or longer, with no restrictions on shorter fish.… Continue reading

Read More »

Fishing tournament fiasco

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show 

If you were on social media in the last month you no doubt got wind of the Lake Erie walleye tournament cheating scandal that involved a popular two-man fishing team from Cleveland and Hermitage, Pa. It received significant national print and electronic coverage as well, and rocked the competitive fishing world, at least in the Great Lakes. The two guys put lead fishing weights and filets from other fish into their walleyes before weigh-in, to boost their weights and win the first place $20,000 prize. Well, they got caught red-handed when the tournament organizer smelled something fishy and cut into their walleye, finding the illegal ballast. The situation quickly escalated when fellow competitors surrounded the cheaters, and the pair was fortunate that police we nearby and escorted them to their truck, or else they might’ve eaten some lead themselves from the surly crowd.… Continue reading

Read More »

Trade Commission lawsuit fighting for farmers

By Leisa Boley-Hellwarth

We live in a fractured society these days. Republicans hate Democrats. Democrats hate Republicans. The rancor of discussion is worse than the interaction between my Border Collies and the barn cats. There seems to be little common ground, which is why a lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission and 10 state Attorneys General caught my attention. It is a true bi-partisan effort. Six of the states are led by Democrat governors: California; Colorado; Illinois; Minnesota; Oregon and Wisconsin. Four of the states are led by Republican governors: Indiana; Iowa; Nebraska and Texas.

The case was filed on Sept. 29, 2022, in the U.S. District Court in the Middle District of North Carolina. Let’s begin by identifying the parties.

• The Federal Trade Commission is an independent agency of the United States government whose principal mission is the enforcement of civil (non-criminal) antitrust law and the promotion of consumer protection.… Continue reading

Read More »

BEEF 509 back for 2023

The long-running BEEF 509 program, hosted by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation (OCF), will be back in 2023. This educational opportunity will be held on Feb. 25 and March 4 and will be co-hosted by the Ohio State University (OSU) Meat Science Extension and sponsored by the Ohio Beef Council (OBC).

BEEF 509 is an educational program designed to teach cattle producers about the food side of their business and how to utilize best management practices to improve beef quality and enhance profitability while learning about value within the beef chain. 

It is designed for beef cattle producers, allied industry personnel including chefs and beef salespersons, veterinarians, teachers, Extension personnel and college students to learn more about the value of beef. Program participants learn about the importance of producing a more consistent and high-quality beef product through a series of hands-on lessons presented by various meat science faculty, staff and graduate students.… Continue reading

Read More »

Harvest progress accelerated

Harvest accelerated during last week’s sunny and dry days, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Reporters in the northwest described vomitoxin concerns in corn fields. Western and southern counties continued to experience dry conditions, with U.S. Drought Monitor showing moderate drought in 36.3% of the State, up from 7.1% during the previous week. Abnormally dry conditions or worse were observed in 73.4% of the State, up from 59% during the previous week. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 24% very short, 36% short, 38% adequate, and 2% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending Oct. 30 was 52.8 degrees, 3.0 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.28 inches of precipitation, 0.16 inches below average. There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 30.

Field activities during the previous week included corn and soybean harvesting, fall tillage, and cover crop planting. … Continue reading

Read More »

Dry conditions, harvest progress near average

Last week, soybean and corn harvest continued against a backdrop of cooler temperatures and minimal precipitation, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Dry conditions persisted in western counties and in a few counties in the northeast, with U.S. Drought Monitor ratings ranging from abnormal dryness to moderate drought across the State. Due to the drier-than-average conditions combined with high winds, red flag warnings were issued in some southwestern counties. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 21% very short, 33% short, 44% adequate, and 2% surplus.
Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending October 23 was 47.9 degrees, 2.8 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.28 inches of precipitation, 0.39 inches below average. There were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 23.

Corn was 91% mature and 36% of corn was harvested for grain. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 20%.… Continue reading

Read More »

Dry weather helping harvest progress

Joe Everett

This weather has been great. I feel like the last couple of days have really helped with drying the corn down a little more. Hopefully today we’ll finish our beans and get back into corn.

Things are getting too dry. It is as dry as I’ve seen in a long time, but for us it’s really helped get our harvest done. It has been nice not fighting the weather conditions when getting the crop out.

Beans have been pretty good on moisture. A lot of them are running in the 9% range. They are dry but I’m not seeing much shattering. We don’t like to run them that dry but hate not to use the good weather to get them off. Overall, we’re pretty happy with the yield considering the year and just how wet we were after we got planted. These beans sat in water for a while.… Continue reading

Read More »

A weed’s dream come true…

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader, a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean check-off

It is a weed’s dream come true, that is if weeds had dreams. After 35 years of service as the Ohio State University Extension State Weed Specialist, Mark Loux, (a.k.a. Dr. Death to weeds) is retiring.

Loux has been a farmers’ best friend and a weed’s worst nightmare. While a true statistical count has not been conducted, it could reasonably be estimated that Loux is responsible for the literal death of millions, possibly even billions of weeds in the State of Ohio and around the world. Add to that number the untold millions of weeds that were never able to germinate because of his persistent recommendation for the use of residual herbicides, and it is no wonder that the weed world is breathing, (or respirating in plant terms) a collective sigh of relief.

Loux’s career in weed science began, in part, due to his dad, who worked as a chemist for Dupont on the East Coast.… Continue reading

Read More »

A look at fall calving

By Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist, OSU Extension

Fall is my favorite time of the year, hay making is done, the feeder cattle are being marketed, college football is in full swing, and for some calving season is well underway.

This summer at our field day in Muskingum County we heard from a family who discussed incorporating a fall calving cow herd into their beef operation. While there are disadvantages to fall calving, there are several advantages that can be capitalized on if we can evaluate and adapt current production systems. Let’s look at how fall calving can be a viable and profitable system.

Cattle prices are seasonal 

As with most things in agriculture, supply and demand have a great impact on prices. Andrew Griffith from the University of Tennessee in 2017 analyzed several studies comparing spring and fall calving systems. After comparing the systems on a 205-day weaning age and two separate feed resource scenarios they concluded that even though spring-calving cows had heavier calves at weaning and lower feed costs than the fall-calving cows, the higher prices of steer and heifer calves captured by fall-born calves were able to cover the higher feed expenses and lighter weaning weights by the fall-born calves.… Continue reading

Read More »

Soils dry as harvest progresses

Modest midweek precipitation during the previous week did not halt growers’ harvest progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Reporters in southwestern counties continued to observe abnormal dryness last week, with consequences for pasture quality and wheat emergence. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 21% very short, 31% short, 47% adequate, and 1% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending Oct. 16 was 53.5 degrees, 0.3 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.49 inches of precipitation, 0.03 inches below average. There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 16.

Corn was 84% mature and 24% of corn was harvested for grain. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 20%. Corn harvested for silage was 95% complete. Corn condition was rated 62% good to excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves reached 96% and 51% of soybeans were harvested. The moisture content of soybeans at harvest was 12%.… Continue reading

Read More »

Casting it forward

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show 

I recently welcomed a guest on my radio show whose efforts I’d like to share with OCJ readers. Lifelong Ohio angler Art Panfil has made it his mission to provide Lake Erie fishing opportunities to those who might not otherwise be able to enjoy a day of fishing on Ohio’s Great Lake. At no cost to them, Panfil welcomes kids, veterans, seniors, and others for a day aboard his charter-sized, fully equipped fishing boat.

“I’ve learned that participating in our great sport offers many rewarding experiences above and beyond the act of catching fish,” Panfil said. “Things like watching the sunrise on the water, seeing a bald eagle fly overhead, spending special time with friends and family, and getting to know your true self are just a few of the impactful events that can truly make a difference in one’s life.… Continue reading

Read More »

Great harvest conditions continue

Continued cool and dry weather was observed during the previous week while row crop harvesting progressed to rates near multi-year averages, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Reporters noted that frost damaged immature corn and soybeans in isolated areas. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 20% very short, 21% short, 57% adequate, and 2%
surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week 50 ending Oct. 9 was 52.3 degrees, 3.3 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.02 inches of precipitation, 0.72 inches below average. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending Oct. 9.
Corn dented progress was 96% complete, 71% of the crop was mature, and 15% of corn was harvested for grain. The moisture content of corn grain at harvest was 21%. Corn harvested for silage was 88% complete. Corn condition was rated 65% good to excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves reached 92% complete and 30% of soybeans were harvested.… Continue reading

Read More »