Search Results for: No days off

Rains continue through August

Ryan Hiser

Things are looking good. We have enough moisture to keep things moving along. Plant health looks well in terms a contrast from earlier this year. We’ve been out checking things and they look a lot better than we originally thought they were. It has been a nice check to actually get out and determine what was out there.

I just came up 71 from Cincinnati to Fayette County. They had gotten a lot more rain than us further south. We had a heavy shower just go south of us toward Sabina. When you look at the area around us it is super wet, but it has been splitting north and south and missing us. We were getting a little dry there for a little while but we did catch some of the showers. 

We’re starting to get ready for harvest. We finished cleaning out a couple of bins by getting the last of the crop hauled out.… Continue reading

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Farm Science review celebrating 60 years

The diamond anniversary of Farm Science Review is on the horizon as the annual farm show is set to celebrate 60 years of research, advancement and education Sept. 20 through 22 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center.

“Farm Science Review is a critical component of our land-grant mission to provide research-based information and practical education to the people of Ohio and beyond,” said Cathann A. Kress, Ohio State’s vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). “We are proud to be the home of the Farm Science Review, a robust show demonstrating the college’s research, and we look forward to carrying out our land-grant mission through the show in its next 60 years.”

With over 2,100 acres dedicated to research, and 600 of those acres being dedicated to field demonstrations at the show, attendees can be sure that they will find something to learn more about at the Farm Science Review.… Continue reading

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Mum’s the word…

By Brianna Gwirtz, OCJ field reporter

Fall is “go time” for Ohio’s farmers. The days become shorter and the nights become cooler as crops all across the state are harvested and hauled to market. It is an especially busy time for Jessica Doehr who will be at work harvesting in the fields and marketing products for J.D.’s Mums and More in Grafton. Her roadside market sells home-grown mums along with a variety of fall staples. 

While she may be in the flower business, Doehr herself is all business. The wife and mother juggles the seasonal business while also owning a farm and being employed on her family’s grain and cattle operation. This year Doehr and her husband Bryan, will grow and market 6,500 hardy mums through their retail stand and sell some wholesale to grocery stores and other roadside stands. 

As a senior in high school, Doehr already knew she wanted to join her parents and farm for a living.… Continue reading

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Scattered showers keeping topsoil moisture adequate

Last week’s moderate temperatures and late-week rains supported favorable row crop development, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1% very short, 21% short, 71% adequate, and 7% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending August 14 was 72.6 degrees. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.91 inches of precipitation. There were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 14.

Corn silking progress was 96% complete, corn dough progress was 65% complete, and corn dented progress was 10% complete. Corn condition was rated 58% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming progress was 95% and pod setting progress reached 74%. Fifty- nine percent of soybean plants were reported as being in good to excellent condition. Oats were 87% harvested. Second cuttings of alfalfa hay were 94% complete while second cuttings of other dry hay were 79% complete. Third cuttings of alfalfa hay and other dry hay were 57 and 41% complete, respectively. … Continue reading

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2022 Virtual Crop Tour

The 2022 Ohio Crop Tour is made possible by Ohio Field Leader — a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff.

For guidelines on how to submit your own entries in the 2022 Virtual Crop Tour (and a chance to win a $250 VISA gift card), CLICK HERE. All yield checks must be submitted by 6 p.m. Aug 11. Thanks also to cooperators from Ohio State University Extension for your submissions.

Virtual Crop Tour: Soybeans

Adams County 

These beans were planted May 10. They are in very good condition with little signs of weather-related stress or disease. There is some grass hopper feeding along the edge of the field. The canopy height is 36 to 45 inches with nodes spaced 3.5 to 4 inches in these 60+-bushel beans.

Adams County soybeans are variable due to a wide planting window, but looking good in the south.

Allen County

These soybeans were planted May 23.… Continue reading

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Ukraine situation and other market factors to watch

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

Four ships loaded with wheat and corn left Ukraine on Friday of this past week. Another four loaded over the weekend. However, it will still take another 500 to 1,000 ships pending the average size of each vessel to move the remaining grain still left in storage there. The deal negotiated 3 weeks ago set a goal of loading three ships per day out of Black Sea ports, with a renewal of the agreement every 120 days. While the deal has potential, logistically it is not a guarantee all the old crop in storage will be moved in time to provide enough room for the new crop being harvested.

It is still uncertain how many acres will be planted there this fall and next spring. Insurance costs to move grain out of Ukraine by ship has increased by 20 times, which will be passed down to the producer in that country.… Continue reading

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August heat and rains

Scattered storms and hot days continued to dominate observed weather conditions during the previous week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 4 percent very short, 22 percent short, 69 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending August 7 was 76.3 degrees, 4.3 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.92 inches of precipitation, consistent with previous year averages. There were 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 7.

Last week’s field activities included fungicide applications on late-planted corn and soybeans. Corn silking progress was 91 percent complete, corn dough progress was 45 percent complete, and corn condition was rated 59 percent good to excellent. Soybeans blooming progress was 90 percent and pod setting progress reached 63 percent. Fifty-six percent of soybean plants were reported as being in good to excellent condition. … Continue reading

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Rains keeping crops progressing

Kurt Wyler

The past few weeks have been pretty muggy and we have been getting a lot of small showers scattered out every few days. It has made making dry hay pretty challenging. We have been wanting to make it dry, but we have been having to roll it up and wet wrap a lot of it. We’d like to do square bales but it has been hazy and the dew didn’t really get dried off until noon and that doesn’t give you a very big window. We thought getting it off now was better than letting it stand. The dry weather last month definitely did affect our orchardgrass tonnage. It was stunted and has not really bounced back. The alfalfa did not really get affected any.  

The crops are looking a lot better now. With the rains, corn is looking great. A lot of fungicide is starting to go on in this area.… Continue reading

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Dicamba drift reminders

By Alyssa Essman, Weed Scientist, Adapted from C.O.R.N. 2022-25

As in years past, we are hearing reports of soybean damage caused by off-target movement of plant growth regulator (PGR) herbicides. Off-target movement can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary herbicide movement takes place at the time of application, also referred to as particle drift. Nozzle type, droplet size, sprayer speed and other management factors affect particle drift, along with wind speed. Particle drift is not influenced by herbicide formulation. Plant injury from primary movement typically has a distinct pattern, often occurring along field edges closest to the treated field and becoming less noticeable farther from the source. Secondary herbicide movement occurs after the time of application and is often used in reference to vapor drift (volatility) or wind erosion. This source of off-target spread is extremely problematic and can be very difficult to predict. There is not always a tell-tale pattern of injury.… Continue reading

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A look at Right of First Refusal

By Robert Moore, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

A Right of First Refusal (ROFR) is a contract between the owner of the real estate and the person who is receiving the right to purchase (Holder). If the owner wishes to sell or transfer the property, the Holder has a legal right to purchase the property subject to the terms and conditions of the ROFR. If the Holder does not exercise their right to purchase the property, the owner can transfer the property to the third-party buyer. A ROFR can be an effective way to help keep land ownership in the family.

A ROFR can be established in a number of ways including on a deed. However, in most situations the best method of creating a ROFR is a stand-alone document that is recorded with the county recorder. By using a separate document, the terms and conditions of the ROFR can be clearly expressed to avoid future confusion or conflict.… Continue reading

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Scattered showers keep crops going

Another round of rain showers kept crops on a good path for development, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Soil moisture levels increased from the previous week, with 81 percent of topsoil moisture reported as adequate or surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending July 31 was 73.7 60 degrees. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.49 inches of precipitation. There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 31.

Activities for the week included fungicide applications on corn, herbicide applications on soybeans, and manure spreading on wheat stubble. Farmers reported limited weed emergence in soybean fields. Corn silking progress was 77% complete, corn dough progress was 23% complete, and corn condition was rated 56% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming progress was 82% and pod setting progress reached 46%. Both were slightly ahead of the average pace. Fifty-four percent of soybean plants were reported as being in good to excellent condition.… Continue reading

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Variables currently impacting the market

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

While there has been widespread hot weather, only 25% of the Corn Belt is experiencing drought conditions. Based on what we know today, the national yield average could still hit the 177-trend line level.

Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey signed a deal allowing grain to be exported from several Ukrainian ports in the Black Sea. The deal included conditions that require renewals every 120 days. Long-term this may create issues, but the market did not react all that negatively to it on Friday. Then on Saturday Russian missiles hit a port protected in the agreement. Today Ukrainians are claiming they will still try to export grain as the deal is outlined. This story seems far from over.

High gas prices have curtailed some usage, which means less ethanol consumption too. About a third of corn used for ethanol is converted to DDGs in the production process, which means some additional feed demand could be found. However,… Continue reading

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Rains bring relief to crops

Widespread rainfall early last week improved soil moisture conditions and supported crop progress, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office.
Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1% very short, 20% short, 68% adequate, and 11% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending July 24 was 77.2 degrees, 3.3 degrees above normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 1.60 inches of precipitation, 0.60 inches above average. There were 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 24.

Activities for the week included fungicide applications on corn and manure spreading on wheat stubble. Corn silking progress was 55 percent complete, corn dough progress was 8% complete, and corn condition was rated 55% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming progress was 65% and pod setting progress reached 27%. 54% of soybean plants were reported as being in good to excellent condition. Oats were 95% headed and 27% harvested, with crop condition reported as 76% good to excellent.… Continue reading

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Crops looking better with more rain

Kurt Wyler

We’ve been pretty fortunate around here. There have been some timely rains in the last 2 weeks with a total of a little over 4 inches. All the crops were definitely needing it, especially the corn that is starting to tassel. Everything is looking pretty good at the moment.

We’re not going to complain if we continue to get more rain. We’re feeling a lot better than we did 2 weeks ago. We were really starting to sweat it then. Things definitely look better now. It appears the corn will not be as tall as usual this year. 

We were able to get all of the wheat off and get the straw baled before the rain. All the wheat ran really well. We didn’t have any vomitoxin and didn’t get docked anything there. There was a little straw around here that didn’t get baled. The majority of our wheat was running in the 90s.… Continue reading

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Water quality update for Ohio

By Matt Reese

The agal bloom predictions are again coming in low for Lake Erie in 2022, good news for the Lake, the people who rely upon it and the farmers who often get the blame for its problems.

The 2022 algal bloom is expected to have a low severity index of 3.5, according to the final forecast from the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration released June 30. This forecast uses an ensemble of different models, which consider phosphorus loading into the lake during the spring and early summer.

If realized, this will be the fourth year out of the past seven that the algal bloom will be rated less than 4 on a scale of 1 (mild) to 10 (severe). NOAA will release the final algal bloom statistics for 2022 in September.

“For years the farmer’s work has been judged on whether a body of water is green or not, but it doesn’t represent the improvements being made year over year,” said Jordan Hoewischer, director of water quality and research with Ohio Farm Bureau.… Continue reading

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Accelerating soybean yields

By Alexandra Stinemetz and Kyle Poling, Pioneer field agronomists

Soybean was brought to the United States in the late 1800s or early 1900s, first as a forage crop. Farmers soon learned that the protein from the seed was a much better feed supplement for livestock than feeding the whole plant. Growing soybean gained in popularity in the 1940s and is now the second largest row crop (based on acreage) in the country.

Plant breeding has significantly increased the yield potential in modern-day soybean varieties. Yield improvements in soybean is focused on (1) producing more seeds per acre and (2) larger seeds on each plant. In the process of selecting higher yielding varieties, soybean breeders have improved disease tolerance, stress tolerance, and altered growth patterns compared to older varieties. 

Today’s varieties spend 7 to 10 less days in vegetative growth and nearly 2 weeks more in the reproductive stages. This change in soybean growth habit has provided huge opportunities for increased yield compared to “the varieties that Grandpa grew.”… Continue reading

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Scouting for disease

By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Agricultural and Natural Resources Educator, Ohio State University, Extension Crawford County

Q: We had tar spot bad in our area last year should we be planning to spray all of our corn acres this year?

A: Tar spot treatment, like with all other diseases, should rely on a strong scouting program. The risk is higher this year, especially in continuous corn, but we also have to have favorable environmental conditions. In fields where corn is following soybeans or wheat, the risk is slightly lower but if favorable conditions develop, spores may move in from other areas. With all diseases, scouting is critical to determining if a fungicide needs to be applied. Lesions will be small, black, raised spots appearing on both sides of the leaves along with leaf sheaths and husks. Spots may be on green or brown, dying tissue. Spots on green tissue may have tan or brown halos. Once tar spot is identified, fields should be monitored every 7 to 10 days for incidence levels to increase, even if a fungicide is applied.… Continue reading

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Five questions you should ask your accountant

By Brian Ravencraft

Whether you are new to farming, or a seasoned pro, one thing is for sure- partnering with an experienced accountant is a must. When it comes to questions you can ask your accountant, the list is endless. For this month’s article will tackle five of those questions. 

Are you well-versed in my industry?

This simple but vital question should be your stepping off point when establishing a relationship with you accountant. Every industry has unique financial and accounting related challenges and needs. Farming is no different. You want your accountant to know how to help you weather every high and low that agribusiness can bring. An accountant who knows the farming industry can help you grow your business, avoid financial downfalls, and identify beneficial opportunities for you such as tax credits, etc.  Accountants are not all cut from the same cloth. Going with the cheapest option or the professional located closest to you is generally not always the best route to take.… Continue reading

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Basis trading

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

Recession fears continue to plague the market, preventing any major buying by the funds. While weather forecasts are changing daily, the latest USDA national yield estimate of 177 could still be achieved. However, if widespread extreme heat continues with little rainfall over the next two weeks, the national yield average may decrease by 1 or 2 bushels, which would likely mean upside potential in the corn market.

Last week I explained how I rolled my July sold futures positions to the May contract and collected 48 cents. This was made with a basis trade at the same time. Following provides some historical context on why I made the basis trade and the final outcome.

During the first few weeks of the Ukraine war the market was very nervous. Traders and risk managers started making trades that covered their needs, anticipating worst case scenarios.

Initially, there was a lot of panic and fear, so the market went into “buy everything” mode.… Continue reading

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Rains and cooler temperatures bring relief

Moderate temperatures and limited precipitation supported adequate row crop growth and wheat harvesting opportunities, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 1% very short, 26% short, 61% adequate, and 12% surplus. Statewide, the average temperature for the week ending July 18 was 72.4 degrees, 0.9 degrees below normal. Weather stations recorded an average of 0.92 inches of precipitation, 0.02 inches above average. There were 4.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 17.

Activities for the week included seed corn detasseling, straw baling, planting double crop soybeans, spraying, and installing field tile. Corn silking progress was 23% complete while corn condition was rated 49% good to excellent. Nearly half of soybeans were blooming and pod setting progress reached 11%; 47% of soybeans were reported as being in good to excellent condition. Oats were 89% headed and 4% harvested, with crop condition reported as 70% good to excellent. … Continue reading

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