Search Results for: No days off

It’s time to talk noxious weeds law

By Peggy Kirk Hall, director of agricultural law, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

Poison hemlock and Canada thistle are making unwelcome appearances across Ohio, and that raises the need to talk about Ohio’s noxious weeds law. The law provides mechanisms for dealing with noxious weeds — those weeds that can cause harm to humans, animals, and ecosystems. Location matters when we talk about noxious weeds. That’s because Ohio law provides different procedures for dealing with noxious weeds depending upon where we find the weeds. The law addresses managing the weeds on Ohio’s noxious weeds list in these four locations:

  1. Along roadways and railroads
  2. Along partition fence rows
  3. On private land beyond the fence row
  4. On park lands.

Along roadways and railroads

The first window already closed for mandatory mowing of noxious weeds along county and township roads. Ohio law requires counties, townships, and municipalities to destroy all noxious weeds, brush, briers, burrs, and vines growing along roads and streets.… Continue reading

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Registration is open for the OFGC 2021 Summer Forage Field Days

The Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council cordially invites you to join forage and livestock enthusiasts from across the state for their 2021 Summer Forage Field Days. Anyone with an interest in pasture management, hay production, or livestock systems is welcome to attend one or all of the field days planned as drive-it-yourself day tours in Central Ohio.

The series will begin on June 25, 2021, in Crawford County. Finishing sheep, goats, and cattle on forage will be the topic of this field day and will include a stop on storing wet forages. This program will feature a tour in the morning of a grazing goat operation at H&M Family Farm with Mike and Angie Hall. Guests Bob Hendershot, John Berger, and Mark Sulc will discuss finishing sheep, goats, and steers on forage. After lunch, we will travel to a second farm to view alternative forage storage methods. At this stop, we discuss baleage and methods to prevent barn fires.… Continue reading

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National FFA announces in-person Convention

The National FFA Organization announced that they would hold their annual in-person convention this fall in the city of Indianapolis. The event, which traditionally brings more than 65,000 attendees, will take place Oct. 27-30. 

Expected in-person events during the convention include the American FFA Degree Ceremony; Career Success Tours; competitive events; delegate business sessions; entertainment; the National FFA Expo and shopping mall; general sessions; student and teacher workshops; and the National Days of Service. 

In addition to the in-person event, the organization will also offer a virtual program, including student and teacher workshops, the virtual FFA Blue Room, National Days of Service and the streaming of general sessions.  

“We are excited to come back to the great city of Indianapolis that has been such a gracious host to us in years past,” said Mandy Hazlett, associate director of convention and events at the National FFA Organization.  “We know convention will look a bit different this year, but we are excited to offer this opportunity to our student members once again.” … Continue reading

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Assessing the damage from the late April snow

By Matt Reese

All types of farmers around the state are preparing to assess the damage from the snow and low temperatures this week.

Evan Hornyak from Geauga County has had some late nights trying to protect the Hornyak Farms u-pick peach crop near Chardon. They have been burning a handful of smudge pots and even built an air blast heater mounted on a tractor to run up and down the rows. 

“The past 48 hours we fought Mother Nature to try and protect our peach crop from the freezing weather, lighting 8 fires strategically placed around the orchard that we were feeding with excavators,” Hornyak said. “All this to just bump the orchard a few degrees and protect the vulnerable peach buds. We will find out in a couple of days by looking at the buds to see if our actions actually worked or not.” 

Ohio Ag Net’s Dale Minyo toured a couple of Morrow County planted soybean fields with Golden Harvest agronomist Wayde Looker the day after the significant snow fall to assess the situation.… Continue reading

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2021 Between the Rows kicks off with a solid start to spring

John Schumm

We started no-till — total no-till — about 12 years ago and things have been working great for us on the soybean side. We have struggled a little bit here and there on the corn side but we are getting closer. I farm with my son, Jeremy, and we both work full-time jobs and this no-till has taken a lot of labor away so we have time to do that.

First we had to take care of the drainage problems. We have used cereal rye and the tilth of our ground just changed tremendously when we started using it. We have a farmer up this way who inter-seeds it with a 90-foot air seeder. He drives it through our standing crops and we try to get that all done the first week of September in corn and soybeans before the soybean leaves start to turn and fall off. We get tremendous growth in the fall.… Continue reading

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ODA and OSU Extension kick off 2021 Ohio Victory Gardens Program

It’s time to get your hands dirty and start growing! The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and OSU Extension Offices are kicking off the second year of the Victory Gardens Program. Due to high demand, the program is expanding to include 25 counties, up from 10 counties last year. Approximately 8,300 seed packets will be available free to the public to get people planting.

“We have seen a revived passion for planting through our Victory Gardens Program, which has expanded to 15 additional counties this year,” said Dorothy Pelanda, Director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture. “Our Ohio Victory Gardens are meant to be enjoyed by everyone, from urban apartment dwellers, to those living in the country, and everyone in between. We hope this will inspire a new generation of gardeners who will be able to enjoy the fruits of their labor for years to come.”

“We are excited to expand our partnership with ODA on the Victory Garden Program.… Continue reading

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USDA announces COVID-19 aid expanded to include more producers

USDA announced its plans to distribute more than $12 billion under a program called Pandemic Assistance for Producers, which includes aid that had been put on hold as well as funds newly allocated in the Consolidated Appropriations Act. The program assists farmers and ranchers who previously did not qualify for COVID-19 aid and expands assistance to farmers helped by existing programs. Farmers will need to sign-up only if they are applying for new programs or if they are eligible for CFAP assistance and did not previously apply.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack shared details of the new plan during a virtual meeting.

“We appreciate Secretary Vilsack’s action to release funds and expand eligibility for farmers hit hard by the devastating effects of COVID-19,” said Zippy Duvall, AFBF president. “USDA’s decision to distribute aid based upon previous applications will help deliver assistance quickly. It was good to hear directly from the Secretary today about this program and his priorities going forward.”… Continue reading

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Grass tetany/ Hypomagnesemia — Start preventive measures now

By Michelle Arnold, Ruminant Extension Veterinarian, University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Lab; A special thanks to Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler for his contributions to this article

What is “Grass Tetany” and when are cattle most likely to have it? Grass tetany, also known as spring tetany, grass staggers, wheat pasture poisoning, winter tetany or lactation tetany, is a condition resulting from a low level of magnesium (Mg) in the blood. Maintenance of blood magnesium depends on the amount obtained from the daily diet since the magnesium present in teeth and bones and is not easily mobilized in times of need. 

Magnesium is required for proper nerve and muscle function so low levels in the blood result in “tetanic spasms” where muscles contract uncontrollably. The disorder in an adult cow begins with separation from the herd and going off feed. The ears are often erect and twitching and the cow is alert, hyperexcitable and may be aggressive.… Continue reading

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Celebrating FFA Week with Northwestern FFA

By Jadeyn Berry, chapter reporter


National FFA week is busy for every FFA chapter around the country. It is meant to be a week of celebrating the great and national organization that is the FFA. Northwestern FFA took time to celebrate the hard working members in several ways. To kick off the week, the school had spirit days, Tuesday Camo day, Thursday Pajama day, and Friday Blue and Gold or Farmer day. Each day has a different meaning that relates to our chapter. Tuesday’s camo day related to the community service project Camo, the Camo organization reached out to Northwestern FFA looking for help with their recent project that is meant to help the people in need from Honduras. Camo’s goal is to send ‘Buckets of Care’ with towels, reusable dishware, frying pans, metal spatulas, sheets, and combs. All items could be gently used but the combs were brand new. The FFA also hosted a coloring contest in order to involve the elementary school in the FFA Week celebrations.… Continue reading

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Virtual Conservation Tillage & Technology Conference 2021

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader: a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

The annual Conservation Tillage & Technology Conference (CTC) will be virtual this year. Instead of the usual 2-day conference at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio, CTC 2021 will be held on FOUR days, March 9-12 (Tuesday-Friday). There will be 5 hours of content each day. Tuesday will feature Crop Management information; Wednesday will focus on Nutrient Management; Thursday will highlight Pest Management; and Friday will cover Soil & Water Management. Each day will start at 8:00 a.m., and with breaks, finish about 2:00 p.m.

Panel discussions are a great format to get good information from varying perspectives. The Monday “Crop Talk at CTC” programs feature 5 panel discussion groups throughout the day.

Laura Lindsey, OSU Extension Soybean and Small Grains specialist

The morning begins at 8:00 a.m. with a discussion titled “Maximizing Soybean Yield,” featuring Dr Laura Lindsey from Ohio State, Horst Bohner from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, and Shawn Conley from the University of Wisconsin.

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No hooks or bullets required

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

I’m in my 25th year of hosting a radio show about hunting and fishing in Ohio. One of the best things about producing Buckeye Sportsman is the guests I get to talk to, from the ice fisherman I interviewed live from his shanty — sipping schnapps and obviously getting more “relaxed” by the minute — to the avid rabbit hunter who had a cottontail tattoo on his back, which he felt compelled to show those of us in the studio, complete with bunny tracks inked down his spine leading toward where he claimed the rabbit lived. It’s been a hoot, and I have tried to make the show as entertaining and educational as possible for an audience who, I assumed, loved to hunt and fish. 

The same is true with this column, which I figure is of special interest to anglers, hunters, trappers and others who enjoy such “consumptive use” activities in Ohio’s outdoors – which some refer to as “hook and bullet” sports.   … Continue reading

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National use of livestock insurance products offered by USDA-RMA

By Elliott Dennis, Assistant Professor & Livestock Extension Economist, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Changes to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Risk Management Agency (RMA) Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) insurance plan took effect on January 20, 2021, for the crop year 2021 and succeeding crop years. These changes included: (a) increasing livestock head limits for feeder and fed cattle to 6,000 head per endorsement/12,000 head annually and swine to 40,000 head per endorsement/150,000 head annually; (b) modifying the requirement to own insured livestock until the last 60 days of the endorsement; (c) increasing the endorsement lengths for swine up to 52 weeks; and, (d) creating new feeder cattle and swine types to allow for unborn livestock to be insured. These changes, in addition to the dramatic changes in subsidy levels and allowing premiums to be paid at the end of the coverage endorsement period, should significantly improve the use of LRP.… Continue reading

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Carbon Goal Could Spur Ethanol Demand

OMAHA (DTN) — The Renewable Fuels Association on Tuesday sought to drive home the focus on lowering carbon emissions as the way to spur greater ethanol demand with actions by the Biden administration and Congress.

Seizing upon President Joe Biden’s goal to reduce carbon emissions, Geoff Cooper, president and CEO of the Renewable Fuels Association, pointed to Biden’s goals as a major opportunity for the biofuels industry.

He countered the push by some policymakers to sell only electric cars by 2035, arguing it’s impractical to flip the U.S. vehicle fleet to all-electric. Instead, the U.S. could make more rapid gains in lowering emissions from transportation by “decarbonizing liquid fuels” through greater use of biofuels.

“You have an enormous opportunity to decarbonize (liquid) fuels,” Cooper said. “Let’s not waste it.”

POSSIBLE POLICY IMPACTS

RFA is holding its National Ethanol Conference virtually this week. In a speech, Cooper laid out some policy moves that would lower emissions, such as reining in small-refinery exemptions for petroleum refiners.

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Soil Health Innovations Conference

New technologies and innovative practices that promise to improve food systems’ resilience at their very roots — the soil — are emerging.

These promising approaches are coming at a time when there is a growing commitment among producers, scientists, food companies, and policymakers to cultivate healthier soil.

The National Center for Appropriate Technology’s (NCAT) Soil Health Innovations Conference will allow attendees to immerse themselves in the soil-health movement and connect with its most forward-thinking practitioners — all from the comfort of wherever it is that they’re most comfortable these days. 

The virtual conference — which was postponed in 2020 because of concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic — will bring together leading experts and innovative farmers from around the U.S. to share the latest in soil science, best practices in soil management, and the emerging technologies that will drive the future of sustainable and regenerative agriculture.

Registration is now open for the online conference, which will be held March 8 and 9 from 8:30 a.m.… Continue reading

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Corn Price Pressures Ethanol Margins

OMAHA (DTN) — Profit margins continued to fall at DTN’s hypothetical ethanol plant as soaring corn prices offset higher ethanol prices at the 50-million-gallon Neeley Biofuels plant.

The DTN National Corn Index has spiked from about $3.75 per bushel in early October to $4.99 on Wednesday. The March futures price on the Chicago Board of Trade — the price paid by DTN’s hypothetical plant — closed at $5.24 on Wednesday, jumping by about $1 since the middle of December.

As a result, the hypothetical plant reported a 37-cent net loss per gallon of ethanol produced in our January update. In the December update the plant reported a 35-cent loss.

Most ethanol plants are not paying debt. If the hypothetical plant were not paying debt, it would see a 6-cent-per-gallon loss compared to a 4-cent loss in December.

A jump in ethanol and distillers dried grains prices in this update prevented margins from cratering.

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Precision U Meetings focus on reduced working days

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader: a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), Digital Ag Team is hosting Precision U virtually this year in a series of four meetings, all with a theme of tackling spring operations with reduced working days.

It is no surprise to Ohio’s farmers that the weather patterns have been changing, and the short- and long-term weather impacts create a need for adaptive management styles.

“Since 1995 we have seen a decrease in the number of suitable working field days in Ohio from April through October,” said Aaron Wilson, Atmospheric Scientist at The Ohio State University and Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center.

Looking back at the 2020 midwest growing season, defined as March through November, the growing season was warmer with both daily high temperatures and overnight lows above the 30-year average.… Continue reading

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PrecisionU: Tackling spring operations with reduced working days

By John BarkerAmanda DouridasKen FordJohn FultonMary GriffithWill HammanElizabeth Hawkins

Precision University is going virtual this year! Due to the pandemic, the Digital Ag team will host a series of hour-long webinars each Tuesday in January at 10:00 AM to replace the annual in-person event.  The 2021 Precision U sessions will focus on “Tackling Spring Operations with Reduced Working Days.” Changing weather patterns have led to fewer days available in the spring to complete planting, spraying, and fertilizing. University and industry experts will share research results and technology available to help you work smarter and more efficiently. Please plan to join us for these sessions!

2021 Precision U: Tackling Spring Operations with Reduced Working Days 

  • January 5 – Gambling with Planting Decisions – Dr. Aaron Wilson (Ohio State University Extension) and Dr. Bob Nielsen (Purdue University)
  • January 12 – Improving Fertilizer Efficiency with the Planter Pass – Matt Bennett (Precision Planting Technology) and Dr.
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Zane Trace FFA Chapter News and Notes — December, 2020

Filling Christmas Care Boxes with FFA Produce
When our FFA Chapter learned that help was needed to fill 50 care boxes with food items for needy ZT families they stepped in to lend a hand. 35 members worked throughout the day on December 14th and 15th to bake cupcakes, brownies, cookies and pies to include in the boxes. Members also divided up 7 bushels of citrus fruit and donated 70 quarts of grape juice that they processed earlier in the fall to the care boxes project. Our chapter is happy to help serve the ZT community and we had a lot of fun making all of the desserts in the food science lab!

Members Host Dog Adoption Day with Ross Co Humane Society
When members of our chapter learned that animal shelters around the US had experienced an increase in the number of dogs being released by their owners, they felt the need to do something about it.… Continue reading

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Ohio Farm Bureau recognizes excellence with 2020 honorees and award winners

A number of individuals and county organizations were recognized in this week’s virtual Ohio Farm Bureau annual meeting.

Three individuals were recognized for their lifetime achievements to agriculture during the 102nd Annual Meeting of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, held remotely this year.

Long-time Ohio Farm Bureau and Nationwide board member Tim Corcoran and Ohio Farm Bureau Vice President of Public Policy Yvonne Lesicko were both honored with Ohio Farm Bureau Distinguished Service Awards, while Becky Cropper was honored with OFBF’s Cooperative/Agriculture Educator Award. Farm Bureau volunteers, county organizations and state leaders nominated candidates for the awards.

Tim Corcoran

Corcoran of Ross County, was a member of the Ohio Farm Bureau board of trustees beginning in 1994, where he also served as treasurer and first vice president. He joined the Nationwide board of directors in 2001, served as board chairman beginning in 2014 and retired as chairman of the board this year.… Continue reading

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Ohio Farm Bureau kicks off 2020 online annual meeting

By Matt Reese

For the first time in more than 100 years, Ohio Farm Bureau’s annual meeting will largely be held remotely in across the state Dec. 7-11, 2020.

“We know for so many of our members the annual meeting is much more than just a meeting. It’s a celebration of our organization,” said Adam Sharp, Ohio Farm Bureau executive vice president. “This year will be much different than our delegates and members have enjoyed over the past century, but like many things happening this year, we had to adapt to today’s challenges.”

The virtual event kicked off Monday Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. with comments from Frank Burkett, III, Ohio Farm Bureau President and Adam Sharp, Ohio Farm Bureau Executive Vice President. The event wraps up on Friday with the business portion of the annual meeting where Farm Bureau policy will be set for the coming year.

“While the delegate and business sessions will be done remotely through secured systems, we will work hard to have full engagement with everyone involved through this crucial democratic process for our organization,” Burkett said.… Continue reading

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