Search Results for: No days off

Big rains slowing field work in some areas

Bill Daugherty

The crops are looking really good. There is plenty of moisture, heat and humidity. We had a few bean replant issues. I replanted about 80 acres last week. We have that back in the ground now so we are pleased with that. Some of the field came up and some did not. We replanted at an angle to not tear up what was there. With the prices right, now we wanted to protect yield and get everything we can out of this crop.

We got our second cutting haylage all made last week. We still have our first cutting dry hay to make, probably about 40 acres. We might start mowing that today. We are going to hit it hard. This will be heifer hay and some for bedding. We just want to get it made dry and not tough. We’ll do some tedding this week to help that.… Continue reading

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USDA reminds Ohio producers to file crop acreage reports

Agricultural producers in Ohio who have not yet completed their crop acreage reports after planting should make an appointment with their U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) office before the applicable deadline.

“Many USDA programs require producers to file an accurate crop acreage report by the applicable deadline,” said Mark VanHoose, Acting State Executive Director in Ohio. “Our FSA staff can assist producers in completing acreage reports, including providing maps.”

An acreage report documents a crop grown on a farm or ranch and its intended uses. Filing an accurate and timely acreage report for all crops and land uses, including failed acreage and prevented planted acreage, can prevent the loss of benefits.

The following acreage reporting dates are applicable for:

July 15, 2021 — Report all your burley tobacco, cabbage (planted 3/19/21-5/31/21), corn, grain sorghum, hybrid corn seed, spring oats, popcorn, potatoes, soybeans, sugar beets, tomatoes and all other spring-seeded crops.… Continue reading

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Farmers Face Expanding Drought in Minn.

LINCOLN, Neb. (DTN) — It last rained in Waverly, Minnesota, on May 27, and farmer Dan Glessing is watching his crops nervously, hoping for a break.

The latest drought monitor shows expansion of moderate and severe drought in areas of central and southern Minnesota. In southern Minnesota in particular, the number of counties in severe drought jumped from parts of five counties on June 8 to parts of nine counties one week later (https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/…).

Glessing, who grows dairy and beef cattle, as well as corn, soybeans and alfalfa in south-central Minnesota, said that without rain in the coming days, his crop faces significant yield losses ahead.

“Some of our areas of our field are going to be compromised by my guess is 20% yield loss,” he said. “Other areas are OK yet, but we do need it to rain soon. As far as drying us out, the extreme heat and low dew points, that really took a toll on the crop.

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More Ag Pandemic Relief Details

OMAHA (DTN) — Biofuel producers will split $700 million in aid funds for pandemic production losses, and livestock producers who have been left out of earlier aid also will see some assistance, as USDA announced more relief funds on Tuesday.

Also included in the aid will be funds for livestock producers who were forced to euthanize animals during the height of the pandemic’s shutdown and slowdown of packing plant capacity in spring of 2020.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced additional aid to agricultural producers and businesses as part of the USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative. The aid should start to roll out to producers and businesses over the next 60 days and will include support for biofuel producers, the timber industry, dairy farmers, livestock producers and contract poultry growers, as well as cost-share for organic conversion.

“USDA is honoring its commitment to get financial assistance to producers and critical agricultural businesses, especially those left out or underserved by previous COVID aid,” said Secretary Vilsack.

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Hard to beat radishes

By Shelly Detwiler, berry farmer and dietician

Dwight Schrute loves his beets but let us talk about another root veggie. Radishes and beets both have roots but that is where the similarities end. Sweet and sassy spring radishes are splashing colors and spice this spring. These colorful little gems are some of the first edible bites of color after Ohio winter shades of white, grays and brown. Radishes are easy to grow and take up small garden space. Most are quick to go from seed to tastebuds in less than 30 days. Radishes pop up in a rainbow of hues of red, purples, pinks, white as well as bunch of different shapes and sizes. 

Paul loves radishes. He loves them so much I have been known to get him a couple of bundles tied with a bow as an exquisite, vibrant, and spicy radish bouquet! Perfect for a guy who does not believe in Valentine’s Day.… Continue reading

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Crop conditions still adequate

Spotty precipitation occurred with some areas reporting too much rain and other areas reporting not enough rain, but overall conditions remained adequate for crop growth, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 90% adequate to surplus, up one percent from the previous week. Temperatures for the week ending June 13 were 6.9 degrees above historical normals, while the entire State averaged 1.25 inches of precipitation. There were 3.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 13.

Farmers sprayed crops and side dressed nitrogen on corn fields. Oats emerged was complete and oats condition was rated 75% good to excellent. Corn planted progress was complete while corn emerged was at 94 percent. Soybeans planted progress was 95% while soybeans emerged was 86%. Winter wheat headed was 97% and the winter wheat crop was rated 77% good to excellent condition. Pasture and range condition was rated 79% good to excellent condition.… Continue reading

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Classic Green Reunion coming to Ohio this summer

By Matt Reese

All things John Deere will be descending upon the Ohio Exposition Center in Columbus this summer for the Classic Green Reunion 2021.

“The Classic Green Reunion was started when a bunch of John Deere enthusiasts and collectors wanted to put on a national show that would move to different places around the country. The first one was two years ago in Nebraska,” said Mike Smith from Marion County, who is serving as the show chairman for this year’s event. “I just knew that it needed to be in Columbus, Ohio for the second show. It is all about the people. It has to be John Deere, but it doesn’t matter how shiny it is or how dull it is. If you’ve got a John Deere and you want to come and have some fun and display a tractor, implement, or a power unit or a toy or a tool, bring it and enjoy the 3 days.”… Continue reading

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Soybean gall midge emergence detected in Nebraska

By Pamela Smith, Crops Technology Editor, Adapted from DTN

Soybean gall midge adults are spreading their wings. Several sites in east-central and northeast Nebraska recorded emergence of the pest on June 8 and June 9, 2021.

(NOTE: This pest has not been detected in Ohio or the neighboring states yet.)

So far in 2021, no gall midge emergence has been reported in Iowa, Minnesota and South Dakota. A diagnostic network of traps is being monitored in these states, where the pest has been identified in previous years. As of September 2020, soybean gall midge had been detected in 114 counties in the four states. It spread to 14 new counties last year.

University of Nebraska entomologist Justin McMechan said the secrets regarding the behaviors of this relatively new pest are still being discovered.

“But some strategies have been developed to help partially reduce pest pressure and losses,” he said.

Soybean gall midge adults look like small, long-legged flies.

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When Herbicides Get Hot

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Few farmers enjoy working outside when temperatures soar into the 90s or higher — and they aren’t alone.

Herbicides, weeds and crops all perform differently in high heat — generally not in the applicator’s favor. With hot, dry conditions roasting parts of the country this week, particularly the northern Midwest and Plains, weed scientists are asking farmers and applicators to keep these five things in mind before they roll the sprayer into their fields.

1. WATCH THE MERCURY

Droughty conditions expanded across the northern Midwest and Plains this past week, and as often happens, scorching hot temperatures played a role, explained DTN Ag Meteorologist John Baranick.

“For the most part, where drought currently is located is where the heat has been the most intense so far,” he said. “Since June 2, temperatures have been in the 90s and sometimes eclipsed 100 degrees from the Dakotas to Wisconsin.

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Soybean Gall Midge Alert

DECATUR, Ill. (DTN) — Soybean gall midge adults are spreading their wings. Several sites in east-central and northeast Nebraska recorded emergence of the pest on June 8 and June 9, 2021.

Soybean growers with a history of issues with soybean gall midge are being encouraged to begin scouting now. Field edge applications of a pyrethroid may be helpful in soybean fields where emergence has been detected and the plant is at the V2 growth stage or greater, according to the June 10 alert issued by The Soybean Gall Midge Alert Network (https://soybeangallmidge.org/…).

So far in 2021, no gall midge emergence has been reported in Iowa, Minnesota and South Dakota. A diagnostic network of traps is being monitored in these states, where the pest has been identified in previous years. As of September 2020, soybean gall midge had been detected in 114 counties in the four states. It spread to 14 new counties last year.

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$4 corn or $8 corn? $10 beans or $20 beans? It all depends on weather and export demand

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

New crop futures prices

Dry weather concerns in the Dakotas and possible ridging in the western corn belt later this month pushed some risk premium into the markets the past few days.  December corn closed at $5.91, up 91 cents in 6 trading days. That leaves the market 50 cents below the highs from a month ago.  November beans also rebounded $1.10 in those same 6 days and is only 30 cents from its high a month ago. 

Old crop basis prices

Corn and bean basis has dropped significantly among end users throughout the entire Midwest.  

Corn began to decrease when southern plains end users started cancelling some of their corn purchases and replaced it with wheat in the feed rations.  That pushed those corn sales back up the marketing chain and into ethanol plants looking for coverage through June and July. 

Bean basis fell because most processors covered their needs through July and pulled back bids once old crop futures rallied above $16.… Continue reading

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Prime crop growth conditions

Adequate amounts of rain and ideal temperatures occurred during the week leading to ample soil moisture supplies and good crop growth, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 89 percent adequate to surplus, the same as last week. Temperatures for the week ending June 6 were on par with historical normals, while the entire State averaged 0.85 inches of precipitation. There were 3.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 6.

Farmers replanted small amounts of crops, made hay, side dressed corn, and sprayed crop fields. Oats planting was
complete while oats emerged was 96 percent. Oats condition was rated 70 percent good to excellent condition.
Corn planted progress was 95 percent complete and corn emerged was at 83 percent. Soybeans planted progress was 89 percent while soybeans emerged was 74 percent. Winter wheat headed was 91 percent and the winter wheat crop was rated 76 percent good to excellent condition.… Continue reading

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When Tragedy Opens Doors

PENDLETON, Ind. (DTN) — Guy Schafer always wanted to be a farmer but never envisioned himself owning land. Now, he’s in the process of buying his first piece of ground, 48 acres with a mix of tillable ground and conservation forest.

The 45-year-old farmer never thought he’d be farming in Pendleton, Indiana. Until three years ago, he saw himself working at Lamb Farms, in Lebanon, Indiana until he retired. Now, he runs around 3,200 acres of waxy corn and seed beans with his father-in-law and will take over the business someday.

Schafer never expected that a tragic loss would bring his dreams to life, yet he’d undo it in a heartbeat.

LEARNING TO FARM

As a child, Schafer could spend all day sitting under a tree on his lawn watching a tractor in the field next door. His family didn’t farm, but their family friends, the Lambs, did. Schafer started mowing ditches for them when he was 13.

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Daily price swings could be big in coming weeks

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

The March 31 Prospective Plantings Report had the United States planting 91.1 million acres of corn and 87.6 million acres of soybeans. When that report was released, it was pretty common for many analysts to suggest we need a record corn yield and perfect weather to produce enough corn to satisfy global corn demand. While that report is old news, the question remains: how much above those numbers will USDA publish with the upcoming June 30 Acreage Report? The report will provide further insights into the actual number of corn and soybean acres planted this spring. Many are expecting both corn and soybean acres to increase from the March 31 report. Mid-May one private analyst indicated 2021 corn acres would be 96.8 million acres. That number caused numerous sell-offs which lasted into the last week of May.

China was extremely active last month buying U.S. new crop corn.… Continue reading

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Crop emergence looking strong statewide

Ross Black

Once we get a day or two of drying to recover from this 6 tenths of rain, then I suppose it will be time to start applying nitrogen to this corn. If it gets 90 degrees, this stuff is really going to take off. 

I know it is a typical farmer thing, complaining that we either don’t get enough rain or too much rain, but boy I would have taken an inch all day long because we could have more than handled it. Everything I have seen so far seems to be coming up extremely well. It was good we did not get a pounding rain because some of this crop that is still trying to come up is not crusted in. It was a slow and steady rain that didn’t hurt anything and everything looks great. 

The wheat is really looking good. I would say maybe in the mid-20s of June it could be about ready to come off.… Continue reading

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2021 Funvention

By Alysa Pringle, chapter reporter

On April 29th and 30th the West Holmes FFA Chapter went to the Funvention held at Harvest Ridge as a part of the Ohio FFA Virtual Celebration. There were 18 total schools in attendance. Throughout the two days members interacted with volunteers from companies throughout the state and had the opportunity to develop leadership skills, as well as improve their understanding of the agriculture industry.  Members also participated in a community service scavenger hunt and watched live sessions of the Ohio FFA State Convention. There were 4 guest speakers: Koleson McCoy – former National FFA President, Sam Glenn – a motivational speaker, George Secor – the CEO of Sunrise cooperative, and Dale Minyo – the voice of Ohio Agriculture and the banquet emcee. Members Cora Crilow, Clay Shepler, Ethan Feikert, Chloe Shumaker, and Emma Stitzlein were recognized for earning their state degrees, Candidates had to have earned or invested $3,000, participated in 8 activities above the chapter level, completed 25 hours of community service, received the chapter degree, and carry at least a 2.0 GPA.… Continue reading

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Avoid hay barn fires

By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

Hay fires are caused when bacteria in wet hay create so much heat that the hay spontaneously combusts in the presence of oxygen. At over 20% moisture mesophilic bacteria release heat-causing temperature to rise between 130 degrees F to 140 degrees F with temperature staying high for up to 40 days. As temperatures rise, thermophilic bacteria can take off in your hay and raise temperature into the fire danger zone of over 175 degrees F.

Assessing risk

If hay was baled between 15% to 20% moisture and acid preservatives were used, there is still potential for a hay fire but not as great as on non-treated hay. A moisture tester on your baler can help you know how moisture varies across your field and when to use hay preservative. Without a moisture tester, if you occasionally find darker green damp spots or humidity is high, be sure to monitor for heating.… Continue reading

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The export delivery process

By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC

Last Wednesday, the corn market pulled back to a technical point and Thursday it bounced off it. Fundamentally, crops aren’t made or lost in May, so debates over planted acres and Chinese demand for old and new crop will continue to manipulate prices. In June, weather becomes a factor and it’s impossible to know today what exactly will happen. I expect a bumpy road yet for prices this summer.

The export delivery process

Recently I received a request for an explanation of the corn futures delivery process. So, I reached out to my good friend Joe Rich of O’Bryan Commodities to help me summarize this complex process.

History

The current delivery process was set up many decades ago when corn exports were nearly 30% of total demand. The total U.S. exported bushels stayed relatively consistent for 40 years but have increased about 50% in volume in the last 5 years.… Continue reading

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Planting progress nears completion, emergence advances

Timely precipitation occurred throughout the week which accelerated crop progress and boosted crop conditions,
according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Topsoil moisture conditions
were rated 89 percent adequate to surplus, up 14 percentage points from the previous week. Temperatures for the week ending May 30 averaged 3 degrees below historical normals, while the entire State averaged 0.84 inches of precipitation. There were 4.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 30.

Farmers continued planting crops between showers. Replanting activities were necessary in some fields. Oats were 94 percent emerged and were rated 72 percent good to excellent condition. Corn planted progress was 92 percent complete and corn emerged was at 70 percent, 20 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans planted progress remained ahead of the five-year average at 84 percent while soybeans emerged was 58 percent.
Winter wheat jointing was 98 percent and the winter wheat crop was rated 77 percent good to excellent condition.… Continue reading

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More market volatility ahead

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Planting progress across Ohio during April and into mid-May was extremely varied. In nearly the blink of an eye, dust, not rain showers, were flying across the landscape. It is now full press on to finish planting corn and soybeans as soon as possible. 

Volatility 

Grain producers and traders alike were sharply reminded as volatility was rampant the second week of May. It announced, “It is here to stay.” Already at mid-May, corn had been down the 40-cent daily limit and soybeans down 78 cents. The May 12 Supply and Demand Report was viewed as a neutral report. Traders, however, were disappointed both corn and soybean ending stocks for crop year 2021 were not lower based on strong demand currently seen for both commodities.

USDA estimated corn ending stocks for 2021-2022 would be 1.507 billion bushels and compare to trade estimates of 1.344 billion bushels. Trader disappointment was noted when U.S.… Continue reading

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