Search Results for: No days off

Cover Crop Know-How

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — When Chase Brown started selling cover crop seed eight years ago, he saw it as a small side-gig to supplement his farming operation near Decatur, Illinois.

Now, like many farmers, he’s happy to discover it is a growing industry worth investing in.

“I started selling cover crops in 2012 for extra vacation and beer money,” he admitted. “But it has blown into a substantial business. It has gone from guys throwing some cover seed out each year, mostly for government programs, to really thinking about it and planning. They’ve seen the benefits and attitudes are changing.”

This year, cover crop seed demand for Brown Seed Sales was off the charts. “This year, a switch just flipped,” he said. A lot of factors might be at play: The stagnant spring and early summer commodity prices pushed growers to trim chemical costs, an August derecho flattened some Corn Belt fields, and in the midst of a growing herbicide-resistant weed epidemic, dicamba herbicides were abruptly pulled off the market in June.

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When the art and science of grazing may not match

By Chris Penrose, Ohio State University Extension Educator, Morgan County (originally published in The Ohio Cattleman)

I remember the first forage presentation I did in Perry County back in 1989 and I have spent my life professionally and personally working with forages. When we started teaching grazing schools in the early 90s, one of the foundational topics taught was the basics of Management Intensive Grazing and those principles include no seed heads, rest periods, and short duration grazing.

That is the science, how about the art? I remember Lorin Sanford, our OSU Extension Beef Specialist saying to me almost 40 years ago that: “It is the eye of the master that fattens the cow.” That is the art. In our environment with so many things that go on, sometimes the art is more important than the science and sometimes the science even supports the art.

For example, we talk about rotating from one paddock to the next, but not all are created equal.… Continue reading

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Seed Genetics Direct Field Days will be held as scheduled

As fall approaches, Seed Genetics Direct will host its annual field days ­in Ohio and Indiana between August 25 and Sept. 16 (see schedule below). Seed Genetics Direct is an independent seed company headquartered in Jeffersonville, Ohio that serves the Eastern Corn Belt.

Free and open to the all farmers, field days provide the opportunity for visitors to tour corn and soybean plots to see the performance of 2021 genetics and technologies. Seedsmen will also be available to provide detailed information and answer questions.

“We’ve added seven new corn hybrids and nine soybean varieties to our lineup for the Eastern Corn Belt. Field days are great opportunity to see products, as well stock up on the best deals of the season. Our September discounts include a 15.5% early-pay discount or a 9.5% savings with John Deere zero percent financing, as well as $10 off per unit of traited corn,” said Todd Jeffries, SGD vice president.… Continue reading

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Waste management really not that different for the city and the farm

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader: a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

Ever since the harmful algal bloom (HAB) of 2014 developed in the Maumee Bay of Western Lake Erie and impacted the water intake and treatment plant for the City of Toledo, the question of who is to blame has been center stage. Unfortunately, as multiple sources contributing phosphorus (P) have been identified, the blame game continued.

Agricultural run-off, industrial waste water, municipal waste water, and residential septic systems are the commonly identified sources of phosphorus entering the water. Many farmers feel like they have caught the most scrutiny because they are considered a non-point source compared to the industrial and municipal waste water sources, which are point sources. Municipalities will point to the strict regulations they must follow from the EPA for any application or discharge in comparison to agriculture.

Point sources typically have a single discharge point or multiple points that can be identified and monitored, whereas non-point sources cannot be measured as easily, and are typically a catch-all for what is left.… Continue reading

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Farm Progress Show and Husker Harvest Days canceled

The Farm Progress Show, scheduled for Sept. 1 to Sept. 3 in Boone, Iowa, and Husker Harvest Days, scheduled for Sept. 15 to Sept. 17 in Wood River, Neb., have been canceled for 2020.

For the first time in its 65-year history, the decision was made to not have the Farm Progress Show due to rapidly changing conditions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Show management had confirmed earlier that the two shows would be operated differently in 2020 with physical distancing a requirement, along with other health and safety changes to the events.

While state and local officials had expressed support for both shows, Don Tourte, Senior Vice President, Farm Progress said that in a very short time it became apparent that the situation across the U.S. had rapidly changed.

“We have been working with officials in Iowa and Nebraska for our shows, and we appreciate the support they expressed for us to hold the events,” Tourte said.… Continue reading

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Corn planting nearing completion, soybeans not far behind

Dry weather and warm temperatures led to much field activity throughout the week, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. Due to improved weather and drier fields, farmers continued replanting corn and soybeans. Average temperatures for the week were approximately 5 degrees above historical normals and the entire state averaged close to a half inch of precipitation. There were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 7. In addition to replanting crops, farmers side-dressed corn, sprayed herbicides, baled hay, and spread manure. Topsoil moisture decreased from 30 percent surplus last week to 12 percent surplus this week. Soybean planting progress was 83 percent, 8 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Corn planting progress was 94 percent, ahead of the five year average by 9 percentage points. Sixty-one percent of corn was considered good or excellent and 75 percent of pasture and range was considered good or excellent compared to 59 percent last year.… Continue reading

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Canal remnants offer glimpse into Ohio history

By Mike Ryan, OCJ field reporter

Constructed in the early 19th century with the goal to connect Lake Erie to the Ohio River and points between and beyond, the great Ohio canal system covered 1,000 miles during its prime years in the Buckeye State. This unique system featured hand dug, man-made canals that were built to be 40 feet wide at the top, 28 feet wide at the bottom, and a 4 foot minimum depth; the canals hauled human and material cargo at a clip of 4 miles per hour by horse- and mule-drawn towboats. Made up of two major north-south running canals — the Ohio and Erie and the Miami and Erie — and several smaller feeder and connector canals, the canal system played an integral role in the development of the Midwestern frontier.

Trustee of the Canal Society of Ohio, Ron Petrie, explained that Ohio pioneers were aided tremendously by the canal system and the state itself owes much of its early growth to this mode of transport.… Continue reading

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You have received PPP loan funding: Now what?

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

So, you have applied for and received a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP Loan). What should you do next to ensure that you are tracking and using the funds on eligible expenses to qualify for loan forgiveness?

 

Loan forgiveness

The borrower is eligible for full forgiveness of the loan principal if the funds are used on payroll costs, interest payments on mortgages, payments of rent on any lease and utility payments. Due to high demand for the PPP loans, 75% of the forgiven amount must be used for payroll costs.

Forgiveness is based on the employer maintaining or rehiring employees and maintaining wage levels by June 30, 2020. The amount forgiven will be reduced if you decrease your full-time employee count compared to the prior year and/or by the reduction in pay of any employee beyond 25% of their prior year compensation.… Continue reading

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Autonomous Planting Revs Up

SAC CITY, Iowa (DTN) — Three tractors and planters seeded more than 500 acres of soybeans at a northwest Iowa farm last week with no one at the wheel.

Sabanto, a Chicago-based robotic farming company, helped Bellcock Farms plant using remote-controlled utility tractors, each pulling five-row planters. Several other farmers in Iowa and Illinois have also hired the company to provide robotic planting help this year.

Autonomous farming has moved from the proof-of-concept stage to commercial reality for the company.

“This is the real deal … it will change agriculture,” said Sabanto co-owner Craig Rupp as he watched one driverless tractor plant while another passed nearby on the way to a seed tender to refill. “We’ve gone from one tractor and planter to multiple machines operating remotely at the same time.”

Sabanto got its feet wet last year planting several thousand acres of soybeans throughout the Midwest with one remote-controlled tractor and planter.

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Clone of No Quick Fix for Pork Industry

GLENWOOD, Iowa (DTN) — The executive order signed Tuesday by President Donald Trump is expected to provide more federal resources to ensure packing plants have safety measures in place for their workers to continue processing meat and other food products.

The order, though, doesn’t mean everything goes back to normal now that thousands of plant workers have already become infected and plants will have to quickly reconfigure options to better protect workers.

The president used the Defense Production Act to deem packing plants as critical infrastructure for the nation to protect the food supply. The order effectively assures state and local officials cannot shut down a packing plant if it is following the worker-safety guidelines issued over the weekend by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

On Wednesday, Trump hosted an industry call with more than 25 leaders from agricultural groups and major food companies, though no union leaders representing workers were on the call.

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Economic assistance for agriculture during COVID-19

By David Marrison, Ben Brown, Barry Ward, Peggy Hall, Dianne Shoemaker, Ohio State University Extension

The coronavirus pandemic has certainly altered all our lives. The impact is being felt by families, businesses, governmental agencies, and civic organizations. To help families and businesses alike, various levels of government have passed legislation to help lessen the economic blow of COVID-19. This article provides a brief overview of some of the assistance available. These include tax deadline provisions, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Families First Coronavirus Response Act, Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation rebates, unemployment compensation, and Wind and Hurricane Indemnity Program, Plus (WHIP+)

 

Tax deadline extensions

On March 21, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service extended the federal tax filing deadline for 2019 taxes from April 15 until July 15, 2020. The IRS encourages any taxpayer who is owed a refund to file as quickly as possible.… Continue reading

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No Quick Fix for Pork Industry

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

GLENWOOD, Iowa (DTN) — The executive order signed Tuesday by President Donald Trump is expected to provide more federal resources to ensure packing plants have safety measures in place for their workers to continue processing meat and other food products.

The order, though, doesn’t mean everything goes back to normal now that thousands of plant workers have already become infected and plants will have to quickly reconfigure options to better protect workers.

The president used the Defense Production Act to deem packing plants as critical infrastructure for the nation to protect the food supply. The order effectively assures state and local officials cannot shut down a packing plant if it is following the worker-safety guidelines issued over the weekend by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

On Wednesday, Trump hosted an industry call with more than 25 leaders from agricultural groups and major food companies, though no union leaders representing workers were on the call.

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Ohio AgriBuisiness not quite business as usual

By Matt Reese

On April 27, Governor Mike DeWine announced a gradual plan for reopening Ohio’s economy after six weeks of a mandatory stay-at-home order that expires on May 1.

The Responsible Restart Ohio plan has three phases:

  • On May 1, medical procedures that do not require an overnight stay can proceed
  • On May 4, manufacturing, distribution, and construction businesses may reopen, provided they can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees
  • On May 4, general office environments may reopen, provided they can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees
  • On May 12, consumer, retail and services, may reopen, provided they can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees.

Agricultural businesses, of course, never closed, said Chris Henney, chief executive officer with the Ohio AgriBusiness Association.

“A lot has changed but a lot hasn’t. Our agribusinesses include feed mills, grain elevators and ag retail facilities and they all continue to operate.… Continue reading

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What business owners can do now that will benefit them following the pandemic

By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAs

I hope everyone is well. Staying healthy and safe during these challenging times. For this installment, I have enlisted the help of some of my colleagues at Holbrook & Manter. Below, they share with you exercises to be doing now, to benefit you and your business when operations return to normal. Until they do, take note of the items below and feel free to reach out to me with any questions or concerns you may have.

 

Something business owners can do now, when work is slow, is thoroughly review current processes and procedures to determine if there is a more efficient way of doing things. For example, is there anything that could be done to streamline the collections or payables process, etc. — Natalie Bruns

 

Stay on top invoicing and AR. Cash flow can and will be difficult so it is imperative that they are talking to their vendors/clients daily to check the “climate” as to how and if their businesses will stay alive and able to pay their bills, and how we help each other of course.… Continue reading

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Enlist Know-How

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Enlist crop acreage is set to expand significantly in 2020, thanks to a boost from new volumes of Enlist E3 soybeans on the landscape.

Corteva Agriscience, which owns the technology, announced in a January press release that it expects E3 soybeans alone to reach 20% of the U.S. soybean market share this year.

That means many U.S. growers will be using the technology for the first time and could face a learning curve, weed scientists told DTN. Enlist corn, cotton and soybeans can be sprayed with glyphosate, glufosinate and two 2,4-D-choline products marketed by Corteva, Enlist One and Enlist Duo.

Here are the top six things to keep in mind when spraying Enlist herbicides this year.

1. FEDERAL LABEL RESTRICTIONS

Enlist One and Enlist Duo herbicides come with some federal label restrictions that applicators should keep in mind. You can find the labels here: http://www.cdms.net/…

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Between the Rows kicks off the 2020 season

Jake Heilmann

We farm corn, beans and a little bit of wheat. We used to have a large hog operation but we got out of that around 20 years ago. We strictly do row crops now and we have a lot of on farm storage. We find we grow our best corn on our sandier ground and we’ve gotten pretty accustomed to corn-after-corn. We plan our corn acres to the amount we can do with one combine in the fall and the remaining acres get put to beans. We get wheat into the rotation when we want to install tile and we do that ourselves. We have a third party bale straw and we do some double-crop beans if we can make it work logistically.

Drainage certainly is showing its benefits like it does every year. We have been able to get on fields that are better drained. We have some fertilizer spread and some anhydrous ammonia applied on maybe a quarter of our corn acres.… Continue reading

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Dicamba Know-How

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — As farmers and applicators head into the 2020 spray season, it’s time to brush up on the challenging realities of applying dicamba to Xtend crop fields.

Four dicamba herbicides, XtendiMax (Bayer), Engenia (BASF), FeXapan (Corteva) and Tavium (Syngenta) are available for use over the top of Xtend soybeans and cotton this year.

Here, we’ve rounded up the latest research and information you need to know before you head to the field with these herbicides.

1. THE FEDERAL LABELS HAVE NUMEROUS RESTRICTIONS

The federal labels for the four new dicamba herbicides are infamously complex. Here are some of the most important restrictions to remember:

— The herbicides are all restricted use pesticides and can only be handled and sprayed by certified applicators who have completed dicamba-specific training each year.

— Applications in soybeans are limited to 45 days after planting or up to R1 (V4 for Tavium), whichever comes first.

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Milton-Union MVCTC FFA Kicks off National FFA Week

Milton-Union MVCTC FFA will celebrate National FFA Week this week! Each year, FFA chapters around the country celebrate National FFA Week. It’s a time to share what FFA is and the impact it has on members every day. When our chapter Reporter, Kelsie Tomlinson, was asked, “What is FFA and how has it impacted you?” She replied with, “FFA is a place where I can work as a team while being involved and sharing my ideas. FFA has brought me many new friendships and skills that I will never forget. Being a part of this organization I became a better leader and it will always be very important to me.”

This year National FFA is February 22nd-29th. The Milton-Union MVCTC FFA chapter kicked off their celebration of FFA week with a snow tubing trip at Valley’s Edge and a Livestock Judging Career Development Event in Mt. Gilead, OH. Pictured are Tyler Kress, Emmie Bohse, Darby Welbaum, Cammy Shook, and Jackson Kimmel at the Livestock Judging CDE.… Continue reading

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Why should you know your soybean disease rating numbers?

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader

Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Plant Pathologist, says farmers should do some homework.

“Farmers need to take some time this winter and go back and look at their soybean seed varieties and see what the scores were for resistance to common diseases that they regularly see each year depending on what the environmental conditions are,” she said.

Anne Dorrance OSU Soybean Researcher Field Leader
Dr. Anne Dorrance, OSU Extension Plant Pathologist

Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN) is a pest that is frequently talked about. Recently, and a multi-state campaign known as “What’s your number? Take the test. Beat the Pest.” funded by the soybean checkoff and SCN Coalition has been attempting to raise awareness of the soybean yield losses as SCN populations rise. Nematodes are becoming “resistant to the resistance,” said Dorrance. Farmers are encouraged to sample their fields for soybean cyst nematodes to know what levels they are actually dealing with on each farm and in each individual field.

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Utica FFA October/November 2019 Update

By Abby Paxton, Utica FFA 2019-2020 Reporter

FFA CDE, Job Interview

Before traveling to the Sub District Job Interview, the participating members had to prepare by creating a resume and a cover letter. On November 7, the participates went to the competition at Johnstown High school. The members were Hadley Ramirez-George, Lindsey Gray, and Rachel Dickson. At the competition they created on application for the desired job, they were interviewed by a judge for the job, and had a follow up call after that. At Sub Districts, Hadley placed 1st, Lindsey 1st, and Rachel 2nd in their age groups. After that they members had a moment to edit the resume and cover letter, then on the 18th of November they traveled to Districts at Licking Valley High School and competed. The participated in the same parts and were scored. A few days later the placing were announced, Hadley placed 2nd, Lindsey 4th, and Rachel 4th.… Continue reading

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