Tag Archives: data

USDA to host special virtual data users’ meeting to gather public input on statistical programs

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will hold its biannual Data Users’ Meeting virtually Oct. 13 and 14 from noon-3 p.m. ET. The meeting is free and open to the public.

The Data Users’ Meeting is held to share recent and pending statistical program changes with the public and to solicit input on these and other programs important to agriculture. The event is organized by NASS in cooperation with the World Agricultural Outlook Board, Farm Service Agency, Economic Research Service, Agricultural Marketing Service, Foreign Agricultural Service and U.S. Census Bureau.

“This is an excellent opportunity for data users to be informed and involved in guiding the agricultural information USDA produces, both now and into the future,” said Joe Parsons, Chair, Agricultural Statistics Board. “NASS believes in transparency and continual process improvement. This venue provides an important opportunity for stakeholder input into USDA’s coordination of agricultural data products that both expand knowledge and create a cooperative environment to the benefit of all who attend.… Continue reading

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Data management important in 2021

Agriculture has become adept at collecting data, but continues to fall short of the economic and environmental promise the information bonanza represents. The Sustainability Ag Research Action Team (SARAT) of the National Corn Growers Association has made integrating and managing the wealth of information coming from the farm a priority for 2021.

“Farmers have a ton of data on everything from fertilizer performance to machinery efficiency, but it remains difficult to link it all together in a way that makes sense,” said Randy DeSutter, SARAT chairman. “If farmers can integrate it all together on their own farm, so it aids decision-making, then the potential can be realized to become more efficient and more profitable.”

DeSutter is confident information management will only become more powerful in managing machinery, hybrid selection, input timing and overall farm management. However, integrating data from outside the farm is also critical such as in the research field.

He cites the volume of information from phenotyping research as a good example.… Continue reading

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How reliable will this year’s test plot data be?

By Laura Lindsey and Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension

Ohio’s corn and soybean crops experienced exceptional growing conditions in 2019, including record rainfall in May and June followed by drier than normal August and September conditions in many areas. As a result of the early season saturated soils, corn and soybean planting was delayed across most of the state. For soybean, planting date is the most important cultural practice that influences grain yield. Planting date is also a major factor affecting crop performance and profitability in corn. The persistent rains and saturated soils caused localized ponding and flooding. These conditions resulted in root damage and N loss that led to uneven crop growth and development between and within fields. Agronomists often question the value of test plot data when adverse growing conditions severely limit yield potential.

With corn, is data from test plots planted in June of questionable value since corn is typically planted by mid-May for optimal crop performance?… Continue reading

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Use plot data to make sound decisions

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

As harvest is completed across the Eastern Corn Belt, seed companies, universities, and growers will have the chance to compile and analyze data from yield testing. One of the most important decisions a farmer will face all year is deciding what variety to plant and in which field to plant it. To ensure that the best possible decision is made next spring, it is important to spend some time looking at yield data. While reviewing data is critical, knowing how to determine whether it is accurate and useful is equally important. Below are some tips for using data to make sound planting decisions next spring.

Look for replicated data

Don’t rely on yield results from one strip plot on a farm or from a single plot location. Look for data from randomized tests that are repeated multiple times and across multiple locations.… Continue reading

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Use plot data to make sound decisions

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA , Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

As harvest is completed across the Eastern Corn Belt, seed companies, universities, and growers will have the chance to compile and analyze data from yield testing. One of the most important decisions a farmer will face all year is deciding what variety to plant and in which field to plant it. To ensure that the best possible decision is made next spring, it is critical to spend some time looking at yield data. While reviewing data is critical, knowing how to determine whether it is accurate and useful is equally important. Below are some tips for using data to make sound planting decisions next spring.

Look for replicated data

Don’t rely on yield results from one strip plot on a farm or from a single plot location. Look for data from randomized tests that are repeated multiple times and across multiple locations.… Continue reading

Read More »

Use plot data to make sound decisions

By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.

As harvest is completed across the Eastern Corn Belt, seed companies, universities, and growers will have the chance to compile and analyze data from yield testing. One of the most important decisions a farmer will face all year is deciding what variety to plant and in which field to plant it. To ensure that the best possible decision is made next spring, it is critical to spend some time looking at yield data. While reviewing data is critical, knowing how to determine whether it is accurate and useful is equally important. Below are some tips for using data to make sound planting decisions next spring.

 

Look for replicated data

Don’t rely on yield results from one strip plot on a farm or from a single plot location. Look for data from randomized tests that are repeated multiple times and across multiple locations.… Continue reading

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How do you analyze test plot data?

Most farmers plant single strips of several hybrids and try to select hybrids for the following year. Single strips are OK for observations but replications can measure variability and give you more reliable results. Consider the following points for analyzing test plot data.

• One location or test is not enough to draw conclusions about the performance of a hybrid or variety but it is a lot better than not planting any test plot at all. However, when combined with information from other unbiased sources, your own test plots become a powerful tool for the selection process, especially when you start accumulating data for several years.

• For analyzing yield data whether from university trials, data from Seed Consultants test plots or third party data, make sure you are looking at data from replicated tests.

• Replications must be randomized which allows every hybrid or variety an equal chance of being on a certain piece of ground or next to a certain treatment as any other.… Continue reading

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Precision ag big data conference

Did you know that over two-thirds of every dollar spent in agriculture is spent on decisions focused on seed selection, fertility, and land access? Producers annually compile new information around input selections, farming practices, and risk management to implement an improved production plan each year. Recently, advances in machine data availability, improved climate modeling, and new technologies including high resolution crop imagery have enabled new industries around the concept of Big Data which is aimed to help producers better navigate their annual decision process and result in more on-farm productivity and profitability.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, in partnership with national precision ag leaders and Meister Media, will hold an Ag Big Data Conference on August 25, 2014 on the Iowa State University (ISU) campus. Big Data is a concept of data driven and value added decisions that has been growing in use across agriculture. As new Big Data products and services are available to producers, questions exist around data privacy, producer value, and best practices to engage with this new industry.… Continue reading

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A new approach to farmer data

One aspect of American agriculture that has been demonized over the past year is the collection of data. Although the process of accumulating stats and figures on the farm is a fairly new concept, it grabbed many no-so-accepting headlines when the questions arose about not only what the data may be used for and who can use the data, but also who actually owns the data.

One company that is taking an industry-changing approach is Climate Corporation. The company, recently acquired by Monsanto, uses measurements through data collection, builds modules and products from that data, and then gives recommendations to farmers to create better solutions for an operation.

“The most important principle for us is that the data a farmer provides to us is the farmer’s data,” said Anthony Osborne, Climate Corporations Vice President of Marketing. “That principle really guides what we are able to do, or not do, with a farmer’s data.”… Continue reading

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Looking for answers to complex on-farm data questions

There have been many concerns brought to attention lately about on-farm data, where that data is being stored and how that data is being used.

Before those concerns can be properly addressed, some terminologies and their exact definitions need to be sought out and set as industry standards.

AgGateway is a non-profit consortium of businesses serving the agriculture industry, with the mission to promote, enable and expand eBusiness in agriculture. They are looking to connect farmers with answers to some very complex questions pertaining to data.

“We need to start the conversation by finding out what data ownership, data control, data security and data privacy actually is,” said Dennis Daggett, chairman of the AgGateway Precision Ag Council.… Continue reading

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Climate Corporation offers precision technology for the farm

The crowds at the National Farm Machinery Show have been very strong so far, and the Climate Corporation has been a popular stop for the impressive precision farm technology.

The Climate Corporation is integrating its leading decision support tools, Climate Basic and Climate Pro, with Precision Planting’s leading hardware and software products to better help farmers optimize production. In addition to a unified account and data service, promotional offers of Climate and Precision Planting products and services will enable growers to drive more yield from their field through better monitoring, insights and control of production decisions.

“We aim to enable greater agricultural productivity through the combination of industry-leading hardware, software and services, and are taking a unique approach with pricing to ensure more farmers have access to these revolutionary capabilities,” said David Friedberg, CEO of The Climate Corporation. “This is just the first step in our effort to simplify how farmers can make technology from soil to cab work for them in a way that delivers tremendous value with real-time, actionable insights and execution capabilities delivered via a single service offering, accessible anywhere and on any device.”… Continue reading

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Maize Genetics and Genomics Database looks to add proteomics data

As the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MGGDB) project moves forward, Jack Gardiner explained how the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service-supported database in Ames, Iowa, has been recruiting its first proteomics data set. While this is an ongoing effort, it should reach completion over the next few months. This data comes from a recently published paper in the prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences by a group of maize researchers at the University of California San Diego.

Gardiner begins with an explanation of what proteomics actually are.

“Scientists now know that the maize genome encodes about 40,000 genes that are the instructions for making proteins,” Gardiner said. “These proteins do the actual work of the cell; they are what actually make the corn plant grow and develop. Scientists refer to these approximately 40,000 proteins as the maize proteome.”

While it may seem logical that knowing the actual DNA sequence of maize would allow scientists to predict these proteins, he noted that is not the case.… Continue reading

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Maize Genetics and Genomics Database looks to add proteomics data

 

As the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MGGDB) project moves forward, Jack Gardiner explained how the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service-supported database in Ames, Iowa, has been recruiting its first proteomics data set. While this is an ongoing effort, it should reach completion over the next few months. This data comes from a recently published paper in the prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences by a group of maize researchers at the University of California San Diego.

Gardiner begins with an explanation of what proteomics actually are.

“Scientists now know that the maize genome encodes about 40,000 genes that are the instructions for making proteins,” Gardiner said. “These proteins do the actual work of the cell; they are what actually make the corn plant grow and develop. Scientists refer to these approximately 40,000 proteins as the maize proteome.”

While it may seem logical that knowing the actual DNA sequence of maize would allow scientists to predict these proteins, he noted that is not the case.… Continue reading

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Fun facts in historical ag data

Did you know? 
In 1933, hybrid corn seeds made up only one-tenth of 1% of the national crop. Within 10 years, that proportion reached 50%, and by 1956, more than 90% of the national corn crop was from hybrid seeds.

Iowa harvested 2.36 billion bushels of corn in 2011, more than the entire U.S. corn harvest of 1935.

That’s just a couple of the fun agricultural facts uncovered in 77 years of historical data now available online from USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). The agency has just completed the digital compilation of data since 1936, which is now easily accessible to anyone with internet access. In the past, this information, published in the annual bulletin Agricultural Statistics, was available in print form only.

“U.S. agriculture continues to progress by learning from our past, which is why it is imperative to have historic data easily available,” said Cynthia Clark, NASS Administrator.… Continue reading

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