Featured News



Coyote trapping/hunting regulations again being debated

By Matt Reese

In early 2020 coyotes were causing quite a stir in Columbus due to a proposal from the Division of Wildlife to align coyote hunting and trapping regulations with Ohio’s furbearers.

“The Division of Wildlife proposed some rule changes that would require anyone who traps or takes a coyote to have a fur taker permit. It also set up a season for coyotes that would be in line with other animals such as fox and so forth,” said Tony Seegers, Ohio Farm Bureau director of state policy. “The provision was really going to hamstring farmers with the creation of a season that would not be beneficial for lambing and calving on livestock farms. The Division, after much consideration and comments from many of our members, decided to withdraw those rules.”

Since then, HB 553 has been introduced to keep the open season for coyotes in place permanently.

“We appreciate the Division of Wildlife withdrawing those proposed rules earlier in the year but we also know agencies can bring rules back.… Continue reading

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Late planting and corn stands in 2020

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist

I finished planting my corn about 6 weeks ahead of last year. I thought with the stay-at-home policy for OSU I would be ready to plant at a moment’s notice. While things are not as delayed this year as they were last, the weather still didn’t allow me to plant in April or even in early May. Oh, and for my planting window, I have had three periods of about 24 hours each.

Late planted corn

With some “late” planting, folks are concerned already about whether or not we have enough growing season to get us through. Not to worry. The corn plant has the ability to adapt to the later planting by advancing more rapidly through the growth stages — work done at Purdue and Ohio State by graduate students of Bob Nielsen and Peter Thomison, showed that the number of growing degree days (GDD) needed from planting to maturity decreases by about 7 GDD per day of delayed planting.… Continue reading

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Will Dec corn reach $2.50?

By Doug Tenney, Leist Mercantile

Grains the first half of May were all lower with corn down 1 cent, soybeans down 17 cents, and wheat down 24 cents compared to the end of April. It should be no surprise that the bearish pattern seen at the end of April continues. Shrinking demand is taking place all around us in many areas of agriculture, particularly the grains. It was the theme seen with the May 12 WASDE Report.

For example, corn for ethanol in marketing year 2019-2020 was cut 100 million bushels. That decline was surprisingly low as many had expected a much more drastic cut. At that time many suggested the corn for ethanol number could be cut an additional 350-450 million bushels in coming months. Looking back only one month, USDA had cut the ethanol number 375 million bushels in April. When you review the weekly corn grind, the decline is sharply affected by the huge number of U.S.… Continue reading

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Weeds have been slow to start off

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist

With the crappy spring, we missed proper burndown timing, pre-emergent herbicide application and now are working on missing the proper timing for post applications. Consider adding a second component to that glyphosate application when you do post your corn or soybeans. The idea is to have a second method of attack on those weeds that may be resistant, have grown a little larger than planned or you have had problems with in the past.

The Ohio, Indiana & Illinois Weed Control Guide is a great resource for getting management tips on how best to apply herbicides. See the recommendation tables to choose potential partners for those post applications. The Guide is available on-line from Mark Loux on his Weed Management website: https://u.osu.edu/osuweeds/. Know also what is appropriate for the herbicide technologies Enlist, Extend or LibertyLink if you are using them.

 

Don’t forget about drift.… Continue reading

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Second annual BeSure campaign aims to help bees

The second annual “BeSure!” campaign supported by National Corn Growers Association is underway and runs through July.  The effort focuses on helping pollinators by promoting best management practices and habitat creation all year long.

BeSure centers on promoting proper use of neonicotinoid products to protect honeybees and other pollinators critical to the food supply and ecosystem. This year, the campaign is seeking to reach not only growers and applicators, but also golf course, turf, and ornamental landscape managers.

In its first year, BeSure! focused its messaging on major crops in the Midwest that utilize neonicotinoid-treated seed, such as corn and soybeans. This year, the campaign is expanding to include neonicotinoid foliar sprays, soil drenches, and granule uses on fruits, nuts, vegetables, turf, trees, and ornamental plants that bees visit.

(It’s also extending outreach to include the citrus industry in California and Florida where neonicotinoids have been very effective in stopping invasive pests, such the Asian citrus psyllid that spreads the Huanglongbing (HLB) disease that is decimating Florida’s citrus industry and has cost the state more than 8,000 jobs and $4.5 billion in the last five years.)… Continue reading

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Guidelines for county fairs released 🎙

By Matt Reese

The calendar is almost to June and there is still tremendous uncertainty surrounding most of Ohio’s county and independent fairs. The topic came up in Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s afternoon press conference.

“Today we are releasing guidelines on how county fair boards/agricultural societies and local health departments can safely allow kids to participate in limited livestock shows and other activities,” DeWine said.

The guidelines include an emphasis on social distancing, limiting crowds, ensuring the health of people involved, and measures for animal care. The governor encouraged Ohio’s fair boards to work with local health departments on putting on the events within the guidelines.

Earlier in the day State Representatives Susan Manchester and Jena Powell sent a letter to DeWine urging the State to comply with recommendations offered by the Fair Advisory Group.

“Each county has faced different experiences and challenges with the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of this, it is clear that there is not a one-size-fits-all approach,” the letter said.… Continue reading

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Setting the stage for high yielding corn

By Roy A. Ulrich, DEKALB/Asgrow technical agronomist

Over the next week or so we will reach the time of year when field activity begins to slow down after the rush of planting, herbicide applications, and sidedress nitrogen applications have been completed. While we may be slowing down, our crops are beginning to ramp up growth and development from the vegetative stages to the very critical reproductive stages. Planting conditions, fertility and weed control have set the foundation for the crop from this point forward and cracks or missing pieces of that foundation may have placed some yield in jeopardy even this early in the year.

Corn is entering the grand growth stage where rapid growth of above ground biomass occurs and rapid uptake of key nutrients out of the soil is taking place. During this time nutrient uptake increases at a rapid pace and continues until late into grain fill. Restriction in root development due to sidewall compaction, tillage compaction or root pruning due to corn rootworm damage can limit nutrient uptake during this critical time.… Continue reading

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COVID-19 merges medical and legal issues

By Leisa Boley Hellwarth, a dairy farmer and attorney near Celina

Doctors shouldn’t practice law. Lawyers shouldn’t practice medicine. And politicians shouldn’t practice medicine either, but I digress. Some of the most practical and timely legal information I’ve read recently came from a physician practicing in a COVID-19 Unit in Detroit, who shared what she wished her patients had completed prior to their coronavirus diagnosis, advance directives. These legal documents are a set of instructions someone prepares in advance of ill health that determines his healthcare wishes. End of life is a topic none of us likes to contemplate, but according to the doc, not dealing with the inevitable can make the inevitable even more problematic and painful for the patient and the family.

She shared the anguish of the next of kin of a 30-year old patient whose body was unable to fight the coronavirus. He had not executed any legal documents nor had he ever discussed the issues with his family.Continue reading

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Schroeder and Stump reelected to AgCredit’s board of directors

Two farmers have been reelected to serve on the board of AgCredit, one of northern Ohio’s largest lenders to farmers, agribusinesses and rural home owners.

Scott Schroeder of Leipsic and Michael Stump of Bucyrus were reelected to serve three-year terms on AgCredit’s board of directors. Schroeder, who was originally elected in 2008, will continue to represent member-borrowers in Region 1, which consists of Paulding, Putnam and Van Wert counties. Stump, who was also first elected in 2008, will continue to serve member-borrowers in Region 7, which includes Crawford and Morrow counties.

AgCredit’s board of directors consists of 10 members, eight of whom are elected by stockholders and two who are appointed by the board to ensure greater diversity and a range of experience.

Eighteen members were also elected to serve on AgCredit’s nominating committee during the elections, which were held in May. Committee members represent the counties in the ag lender’s territory and identify suitable candidates for open director positions each year.… Continue reading

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Alfalfa continues to mature

By Angela Arnold, Mark Sulc, Jeff Stachler, Dean Kreager, Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Ohio State University Extension

The alfalfa crop over the past week has continued to advance in maturity. Pure alfalfa stands across Ohio are ready to be harvested for high quality forage. Producers in dryer regions were able to start harvesting alfalfa fields over the weekend. Western Ohio has had larger rainfall totals than Eastern Ohio over the last two weeks. Keep in mind that harvesting when the soil is too wet and soft will do non-reversible compaction damage to the stand and will lower the productivity the rest of this year and into future years.

Grasses in Central Ohio have headed out. Once grasses reach the early heading stage, they are already past the prime for high producing lactating dairy cows; however, grass in early heading is still good for feeding to many other classes of livestock with lower requirements than lactating dairy cows.… Continue reading

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Soil moisture and the weather to watch in 2020

By Dusty Sonnenberg, CCA, Ohio Field Leader: a project of the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff

There is an old saying that “drought begets drought.”

Aaron Wilson, Ohio State University Extension climate specialist explains that soil moisture can have an impact on both temperature and precipitation.

“When we get into weather patterns of dry weather and drought conditions, and it seems like the pattern continues, the level of soil moisture plays a role in that,” Wilson said. “The same applies when we get in a wet pattern, and it just keeps raining. The level of moisture in the soil can impact both the precipitation and temperature.

“This past winter in Ohio was the fifth warmest on record since 1895 looking at the period of December through February. It was also the 22nd wettest. Relatively warm and wet describe how the spring of 2020 began as well. March was the 11th warmest, especially when you factor in overnight lows, and it was the 15th wettest on record statewide.”… Continue reading

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Canal remnants offer glimpse into Ohio history

By Mike Ryan, OCJ field reporter

Constructed in the early 19th century with the goal to connect Lake Erie to the Ohio River and points between and beyond, the great Ohio canal system covered 1,000 miles during its prime years in the Buckeye State. This unique system featured hand dug, man-made canals that were built to be 40 feet wide at the top, 28 feet wide at the bottom, and a 4 foot minimum depth; the canals hauled human and material cargo at a clip of 4 miles per hour by horse- and mule-drawn towboats. Made up of two major north-south running canals — the Ohio and Erie and the Miami and Erie — and several smaller feeder and connector canals, the canal system played an integral role in the development of the Midwestern frontier.

Trustee of the Canal Society of Ohio, Ron Petrie, explained that Ohio pioneers were aided tremendously by the canal system and the state itself owes much of its early growth to this mode of transport.… Continue reading

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Making the most of a COVID slowdown

Like much of the economy, the hydraulic business really slowed down in recent weeks. Though COVD-19 kept things slow at the shop, DNC Hydraulics employees shifted gears into building mode to work on a new 60-foot by 48-foot building at their Rawson facility.

The crew broke ground in late April in response to new growth for the business. The DNC team started by creating a stone pad. After that, the poles went up and the framing started. The next step was to get the trusses up.

“The fun part about this build is that our employees are the main builders,” said Cody Conaway, DNC Hydraulics sales manager. “With the slow down we have had due to COVID-19, our guys really stepped up to help build this building.”

 … Continue reading

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Thinking of direct food sales? Consider these legal issues

By Peggy Kirk Hall, director of agricultural law, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law Program

There’s much disagreement over what we know about COVID-19, but one thing we can agree upon is that it has left an impact on the food supply chain. For some food producers, that impact is creating opportunity. Many growers see the potential of filling the gaps created by closed processing facilities, thin grocery shelves, and unwillingness to shop inside stores. If you’re one of those growers who sees an opportunity to sell food, we have a few thoughts on legal issues to consider before moving into the direct food sales arena. Doing so will reduce your risks and the potential of legal liability.

 

Follow COVID-19-related guidelines

Perhaps this goes without saying, but businesses should take COVID-19 guidelines seriously. Doing so will hopefully reduce the potential of a COVID-19 transmission in the operation while also minimizing the risk of an enforcement action and potential legal liability for failing to protect employees and customers.… Continue reading

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Significant rainfall slowed progress

A modest amount of field work occurred in the state due to increased rain, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. High amounts of precipitation caused localized flooding throughout the state, bringing planting progress to a halt in most areas. Although reporters suspected some damage occurred to recently planted crops, most noted that it was too early to tell how severe that damage was. Average temperatures for the week were close to historical normals and the entire state averaged just under 3 inches of precipitation. There were 1.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 24.

Despite increased amounts of rain, farmers were able to continue small amounts of spraying activities and began hay cutting. Topsoil moisture increased from 29% surplus last week to 56% surplus this week. Corn planted progress was 66%, 2 percentage points ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans planted progress remained ahead of the five-year average by 9 percentage points.

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Hay and straw: Labor of love? Or love of labor?

By Matt Reese

Baling hay and straw is a labor of love for brothers Miles and Caleb von Stein that requires a love of labor they’ve had since high school.

“Growing up, Caleb and I loved baling. We did it for our FFA SAE project. We started with 20 or 40 acres of straw. Dad and my uncle said we’d never get it all baled,” Miles said. “That was in 2010 and it almost was a personal challenge and we tried to do more every year. Then they didn’t think we could do 50 or 60 acres and now we are doing 600 or 700 acres. The fact that they thought we couldn’t do it almost fueled us even more to grow.”

Small square bales of hay and straw have paved the way for the von Steins to take their Hancock County family farm in a new and innovative direction focused on soil health, high quality products and meeting unique customer demands.… Continue reading

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Post-planting scouting

By John Fulton

Planting remains one the most important, if not most important, field operation for row-crop producers. In most cases, there is one pass to “get it right” with the planting operation. Two key goals of the planter are to achieve optimum stands and uniform emergence to maximize yield potential once the seed is placed in the furrow. Once placed in the soil, corn emergence is influenced by several factors and should be kept in mind not only during planting but also post-planting when scouting.

While planting is the critical field operation, scouting post-planting is important to evaluate planter performance (i.e. Did I “get it right?”) and understanding a field’s yield potential for the current cropping season. Scouting can provide valuable notes on how the planter performed across and between fields with this data used to help improve planting in the future. Mobile applications can enhance scouting since most today provide the ability to geo-reference (i.e.… Continue reading

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Ohio corn, soybean and wheat enterprise budgets: Projected returns for 2020

By Barry Ward, Ohio State University assistant Extension professor, leader in Production Business Management

COVID-19 has created an unusual situation that has negatively affected crop prices and lowered certain crop input costs. Many inputs for the 2020 production year were purchased or the prices/costs were locked in prior to the spread of this novel coronavirus. Some costs have been recently affected or may yet be affected. Lower fuel costs may allow for lower costs for some compared to what current budgets indicate.

Production costs for Ohio field crops are forecast to be largely unchanged from last year with lower fertilizer expenses offset by slight increases in some other costs. Variable costs for corn in Ohio for 2020 are projected to range from $359 to $452 per acre depending on land productivity. Variable costs for 2020 Ohio soybeans are projected to range from $201 to $223 per acre. Wheat variable expenses for 2020 are projected to range from $162 to $198 per acre.… Continue reading

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Teens to advise ODNR youth outreach program

By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio show

If only this were offered when I was a teen: the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is looking for highly motivated high school students to serve on the Conservation Teen Advisory Council (ConTAC), a statewide network of student leaders working together to enhance ODNR’s youth outreach and program efforts.

“This is a great opportunity for ambitious young people to jumpstart their future careers with skills that transfer to any profession,” said ODNR Director Mary Mertz of the opportunity.

ConTAC members will develop innovative and practical ideas that empower young people to protect and preserve Ohio’s natural resources, provide feedback and make recommendations to enhance outdoor outreach. Council members will also get the chance to explore careers in the natural resources sector and develop valuable networking and leadership skills.

A new class of 30 teens will be selected to serve on ConTAC for the 2020-2021 academic year.… Continue reading

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March margin triggers Dairy Margin Coverage Program payment

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) announced that the March 2020 income over feed cost margin was $9.15 per hundredweight (cwt.), triggering the first payment of 2020 for dairy producers who purchased the appropriate level of coverage under the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program. Current projections indicate that a DMC payment is likely to trigger every month for the remainder of 2020, a different expectation from last July when some market models had forecast no program payments for 18 months.

“This payment comes at a critical time for many dairy producers,” said Richard Fordyce, FSA Administrator. “It is the first triggered DMC payment for 2020, and the first payment to dairy producers in seven months.”

Authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill, DMC is a voluntary risk management program that offers protection to dairy producers when the difference between the all-milk price and the average feed price (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount selected by the producer.… Continue reading

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